dbawel

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  1. Like
    dbawel got a reaction from AhmedElyamani in Babylon.js vs. Three.js... Choosing a WebGL Framework for Sony   
    Hello,
    I thought to place this on the demos and projects thread, however I decided to post this here as it is more a topic for which framework to use and why. I was hired by an elite software development group at Sony Electronics to help them navigate through WebGL to build a pipeline to deliver content for the South By Southwest convention and to create a foundation to quickly develop games and online media for future projects. In short, I was tasked to escape the limitations of 2D media and help Sony move forward into 3D content taking advantage of the WebGL rendering standards. 
    This was no esay task, as I was hired Dec. 11th, and was given a hard deadline of March 5 to deliver 2 multiplayer games which were to be the focus of Sony's booth at SXSW in Austin Texas. But first I had to run a quick evaluation and convince a very proficient team of Engineers which framework was the best fit for Sony to invest considerable resources into for SXSW and which was the right coice to take them into future projects. Yhis wa a huge consideration as the WebGL framework which was to be chosen was to play a much greater role at Sony Electronics considering the group I was assigned to works well ahead of the rest of the industry... developing what most likely will be native intelligent applications on Sony devices (especially smartphones) in the near future. These are applications which benefit the consumer in making their day to day interactions simple and informative. Thus the WebGL framework to be chosen needed to be an element in displaying information as well as entertainment for a greater core technology which is developing daily in a unique tool set used by the software engineers to build applications which allows Sony to remain the leader not only in hardware technology, but in the applications which consumers want to use on Sony devices.
    But as I was working for Sony, I also had a greater task as there were existing expectations in developing a game on Sony devices which needed to be on par with what consumers already were experiencing with their Playstation consoles. As unrealistic as this might initially appear, that had to be the target as we couldn't take a step back from the quality and playability the consumer was already accustomed to.  So back to the first task... selecting the WebGL framework for Sony Electronics to use moving forward. Rather than telling a story, I'll simply outline why there was little discussion as to which framework to choose. Initially Sony requested someone with Three.js experience as is more than often the case. So when they approached me for the position, I told them I would only consider the position if they were open to other frameworks as well. They were very forthcoming to open their minds to any framework as their goal was not political in any way - as they only cared about which framework was going to provide them with the best set of tools and features to meet their needs. And one might certainly assume that since Sony Playstation is in direct competition with Microsoft Xbox, and Microsoft is now providing the resources in house to develop babylon.js, that Sony Electronics might see a PR conflict in selecting babylon.js as their WebGL development framework. However, I'm proud to say that there was never a question from anyone at Sony. I was very impressed that their only goal was to select the very best tools for the development work, and to look beyond the perceived politics and to develop the very best applications for the consumer and to fulfill their obligations to their shareholders in building tools that consumers want on their smartphones and other electronic devices.
    So once again... Three.js vs. Babylon.js. This was a very short evaluation. What it came down to was that three.js had far more libraries and extensions - however, this was not the strength of three.js since there is no cohesive development cycles with three.js and although many libraries, tools, and extensions exist, more than often they are not maintained. So it was easy to demonstrate that practically any tool or extension we would require for the SXSW production would require myself or the team updating the extension or tool to be compatible with the other tools we might use on the project. This was due to the failings of the framework since each developer who writes an extension for three.js is writing for a specific compatibility for their own project needs... and not for the overall framework... as this is not within the scope of any developer or group of developers. Thus I find that it requires weeks if not months of of maintenance in three.js prior to building content, just to ensure compatibility between all of the tools and extensions needed to use for most projects. As for babylon.js, the wheel is not generally re-invented as it is with three.js, as most extensions are quickly absorbed into a cohesive framework quickly - provided they have universal appeal - and this integration ensures compatibility as there are fewer and fewer extensions to use, but instead an integrated set of tools which are thoroughly tested and used in production revealing any incompatibilities quickly.
    The bottom line is that there are no alpha, beta, and development cycles in three.js, thus no stable releases. Whereas the opposite exists with babylon.js. There is a cohesive development of the tools, and Sony is smart enough to see beyond the politics and to realize that having Microsoft support the development of babylon.js is a huge bonus for an open source framework. And if anyone had to choose a company to support the development of a WebGL or any framework, who better than Microsoft? With practically every other useful WebGL framework in existence spawned by MIT, most all are barely useful at best. And why would anyone pay to use a limited WebGL framework such as PlayCanvas when Babylon.js is far more functional, stable, and free? This baffles me and most anyone who chooses one project using babylon.js. The only argument against babylon.js is that the development of the framework is now supported in house by Microsoft. But for myself and others, this is a positive, not a negative. I've been assured by the creators and lead developers of babylon.js that they have secured an agreement with Microsoft ensuring the framework remain open source and free. This ensures that anyone is able to contribute and review all code in the framework, and that it remains in the public domain. Sony gets this and we quickly moved forward adopting babylon.js as the WebGL framework within at least one division of Sony Electronics.
    At the end of this post I'll provide a link on youtube to a news report of not only the games we built for SXSW, but the exciting new technology on built on Sony phones which uses the phones camera to capture a hight resolution (yet optimized) 3D scan of a person's head. This is only a prototype today, but will be a native app on Sony phones in the future. So our task was not only to develop multiplayer games of 15+ players simultaneous in real-time, but to have a continuous game which adds a new player as people come through the booth and using a Sony phone, has their head scanned. This was an additional challenge, and I must say that I was very fortunate to work with a group of extremely talented software engineers. The team at Sony is the best of the best, I must say.
    All in all, it was an easy choice in choosing babylon.js for the WebGL framework at Sony Electronics in San Diego. Below is a news report from SXSW which shows the new scanning technoogy in use, as well as a brief example of one of the games on the large booth screen. And using Electron (a stand-alone version of Chromium), I was able to render 15 high resolution scanned heads, vehicles for each head, animation on each vehicle, particles on each vehicle, and many more animations, collisions, and effects without any limitations on the game - all running at approx. 40 fps. The highlight of the show was when the officers from Sony Japan came through the booth... which are the real people we work for... gave their thumbs up, as they were very happy with hat we achieved in such a short time. And these were the people who wanted to see graphics and playability comparable to what the Playstation delivered. And they approved. 
    Link:
    Thanks to babylon.js.
    DB
  2. Like
    dbawel got a reaction from webdva in How good is Babylon.js?   
    @Barsik_The_CaT -
    Developing within the WebGL standard is becomming a highly sought after skillset these days, and for the past 3 months, I have been extremely busy working professionally on projects using babylon.js. And most recently, just completed a project working directly with another member @Pryme8 - in which the project pushes the limits of touchscreen display technology as well as WebGL physics, importing models and materials from external applications, proceedural animation, etc. - and we just finished running the scene on an interactive 90 inch touchscreen display - which was highly engaging for the users attending the trade show and was a complete success. And @Deltakosh and @davrous - I'm trying to get permission to show as a demo - but it was for a pharmaceutical company so unforunately we're up against legal limitations - but I'll let you know as soon as I hear from legal on this. 
    Back to your question - I highly recommend babylon.js, as even with a 2D game project, I find very few imitations on what we are able to accomplish; as BJS provides us capabilities as close to any work I was developing using OpenGL or DirectX several years back - as much of my work was building AAA video game titles for consoles such as XBOX and PlayStation.
    I mention this as I personally feel that gaining the experience using BJS is becomming invaluable - since there are very few developers with experience in WebGL, and so much work now and will really be exploding next year. So perhaps using a framework which is more tailored in its' design and tools developed more specifically for a 2D game, if you are able to use babylon.js and gain the experience, then it's quite easy these days to supliment your income to provide you with the resources and tools necessary to carry you through the time required to develop a real product you can release for profit - if this is your goal. Otherwise, you may likely spend your time stressing out during the development process - which most developers rarel make it through and rarely deliver te game or application they set out to build. Perhaps your situation is different and tese are not concerns, but gaining the experience I now have using babylon.js allows me to take on well paying work when I need to cover costs and certainly living expeses.
    But of course, it's a matter of first designing your game with babylon.js in mind, and putting together simple scenes as proof of concept that BJS will provide you whatever the needs of your game are. This would be my recommendation, asI get called for jobs in WebGL weekly beginning about 6 months ago - and am able to supliment my income greatly while still focusing on my company's own application which we will finally bring to market in Jan. of 2017. I began using BJS about 3 years ago now, and although I knew this would become a valued skillset, I still find it difficult to believe how many jobs are now coming to bear - as every single company and/or recruiter tells me clearly that they cannot find anyone with WebGL experience - so I find myself practically able to name my own price when it comes to accepting work - not all the time, but more than often.
    So as many devs on this forum recommend  - as I do also - that a 2D framework would perhaps be an easier framework for you to develop you 2D game, this will not provide you with the additional experience required to seek other work within WebGL (in my own opinion), whereas babylon.js experience is a huge commodity and growing amost exponentially today. So I guess it all depends upon your personal goals and where you want to be in  2 - 3 years. As for me, I finally find my work within WebGL  engaging and interesting one again - after being bored to death repeting the same work again and again creating films and games on the standard platforms - whereas within WebGL I'm once again creating things for the very first time in history, and always a challenge - which for me, keeps me alive and excited to begin work each day.
    I don't consider the above comments off topic, however I'm guessing this is a different approach to answering your question. But for me, I try to look towards the future, and can clearly see that babylon.js offers me possibilities to discover new challenges, opportunities, and technologies - and to both create - and to find a far more interesting future than what I might consider as the easiest path to accomplish the singular goal directly in front of me at this time. And I must than @Deltakosh, @davrous, and all others who re working hard to provide this unique opportunity for me to revitalize my interest in work, as well as to maintain my qulity of life and provide for my family. I can tell you that there is considerable monies (millions) currently being invested into WebGL, and expanding into the billions next year. As I mentioned, I receive emails weekly due to my (limited) experience working in babylon.js (WebGL in general, but companies are only looking for BJS or Three.js experience currently), and this has allowed me to pay for my company and to build applications which will be released soon, without the need to worry about funding and/or living expenses; and most importantly as we will have released a product to market soon, we've are able to maintain 100% ownership of our IP and applications, and are now receiving licensing and funding agreements which are reasonable without giving up much equity in our company. Which in business, is as good as it gets - practically a dream in the world of technology investment.
    I hope my perspective is of some value to you and others reading this, but regardless, we all must keep the lights on, and all hope to maintain a healthy balance between our work in entertainment media and/or applications - and financial stability.
    Welcome to the forum, and best of luck. Oh... and by the way, you have this forum to make certain you achieve your goals using babylon.js - which I can say undoubtedly that you will in no way find another community with the passion to assist others as we do within these pages. If you do choose babylon.js, I promise you won't be working alone on your game.
    Cheers,
    DB
     
  3. Like
    dbawel got a reaction from Madclaws in Error on loading .OBJ files   
    @Madclaws -
    Firstly, your file names don't match, so unless you have edited the OBJ and MTL files yourself, the loader is looking for the same name MTL file. Start by opening your OBJ file in any text editor, and verify the name of the .mtl file the .obj file is looking for. This will be in one of the first few lines of the OBJ file. As it appears the OBJ file is looking for a different MTL file name, this is not normal. It;s always best to keep your OBJ, MTL, and JPG (texture file) the same name as every exporter I've ever used writes these as the same name; and looks for the same name files on import - definitely the Babylon OBJ file importer. And your OBJ manifest file and MTL file are of different names. So I might assume your other files are not matching the names precisely. Upper case and lower case must match also.
    You don't need a manifest file... however, if you want to get rid of the 404 error for the manifest file, simply create an empty file with the same name as your OBJ file, and give it the extension .manifest. Example 'obj_name.babylon.manifest'. However, this is not important as others have already stated. If you're loading multiple OBJ files, then I recommend editing your OBJ file and remove the reference to the .manifest file. Then it won't look for the file. 
    As for the .mtl file, this must also have the same name as the obj file. Example 'obj_name.mtl'. This is your material file with all your material attributes (settings.) This will work the same way if your mesh has a texture which will also have the same name as your obj file with an extension for the texture such as 'obj_name,jpg'. 
    I work with OBJ files every day, and almost always edit the OBJ and MTL files as they are self explanatory once you open in a text editor. If you don't want a MTL file on your mesh, then simply remove the reference to the MTL file in your OBJ file. Then it will simply use a default material or none at all depending on your OBJ file edit. However, I find that different applications such as Blender often write odd values to the MTL file which is completely dependent on the user who has set up the material and texture. So I almost always edit my OBJ and MTL files as I can get the desired material editing the ambient, diffuse, specular values, etc. directly in the ascii files themselves. It's so very easy to read and edit. 2 minutes experimenting with no prior knowledge is more time than anyone needs to learn everything there is to know about the OBJ format - including editing normals, vertices, etc.
    It's simple for a single OBJ file, but if you work with real time scans producing hundreds of unique OBJ files to load in real time, then I write simple scripts to edit each OBJ file as needed. The .babylon format has many attributes which is far more advanced if you want to export scenes. However, if you are only importing meshes, the the OBJ format is by far the most reliable format and provides a level of flexibility in being able to edit the ascii files directly. Once you open the OBJ and MTL files and spend a couple minutes editing these and learning what values represent the different attributes, this will become your format of choice for meshes. I can't imagine otherwise, as there is little to nothing which will cause you problems once you understand the format. Remember that you can always apply Babylon materials and textures (and other attributes such as shaders) after import - which I do often.
    I hope this info helps, as you're definitely on the right path to the ease of importing OBJ files. If you read this and follow the advice to test a few edits to the files, I can't imagine you won't have a firm grasp of the OBJ format. However, if you still have issues, then post an OBJ, MTL, and JPG file all with the same name before the extension, and I'll be happy to walk you through the key lines to edit to gain full control over the resulting mesh(s) import.
    FYI - I introduced the other software engineers at Sony Electronics to the OBJ format, and it is now the format of choice for practically all mesh content due to it's simplicity and flexibility. This is after they spent several months working will every other format and exporter. No need to over complicate simple tasks - which often happens due to the OBJ format being decades old now; so people assume newer formats are better. But there's a reason why the OBJ format continues to be the most widely used in export/import between most applications.
    Cheers,
    DB
  4. Like
    dbawel got a reaction from ssaket in Error on loading .OBJ files   
    @Madclaws -
    Firstly, your file names don't match, so unless you have edited the OBJ and MTL files yourself, the loader is looking for the same name MTL file. Start by opening your OBJ file in any text editor, and verify the name of the .mtl file the .obj file is looking for. This will be in one of the first few lines of the OBJ file. As it appears the OBJ file is looking for a different MTL file name, this is not normal. It;s always best to keep your OBJ, MTL, and JPG (texture file) the same name as every exporter I've ever used writes these as the same name; and looks for the same name files on import - definitely the Babylon OBJ file importer. And your OBJ manifest file and MTL file are of different names. So I might assume your other files are not matching the names precisely. Upper case and lower case must match also.
    You don't need a manifest file... however, if you want to get rid of the 404 error for the manifest file, simply create an empty file with the same name as your OBJ file, and give it the extension .manifest. Example 'obj_name.babylon.manifest'. However, this is not important as others have already stated. If you're loading multiple OBJ files, then I recommend editing your OBJ file and remove the reference to the .manifest file. Then it won't look for the file. 
    As for the .mtl file, this must also have the same name as the obj file. Example 'obj_name.mtl'. This is your material file with all your material attributes (settings.) This will work the same way if your mesh has a texture which will also have the same name as your obj file with an extension for the texture such as 'obj_name,jpg'. 
    I work with OBJ files every day, and almost always edit the OBJ and MTL files as they are self explanatory once you open in a text editor. If you don't want a MTL file on your mesh, then simply remove the reference to the MTL file in your OBJ file. Then it will simply use a default material or none at all depending on your OBJ file edit. However, I find that different applications such as Blender often write odd values to the MTL file which is completely dependent on the user who has set up the material and texture. So I almost always edit my OBJ and MTL files as I can get the desired material editing the ambient, diffuse, specular values, etc. directly in the ascii files themselves. It's so very easy to read and edit. 2 minutes experimenting with no prior knowledge is more time than anyone needs to learn everything there is to know about the OBJ format - including editing normals, vertices, etc.
    It's simple for a single OBJ file, but if you work with real time scans producing hundreds of unique OBJ files to load in real time, then I write simple scripts to edit each OBJ file as needed. The .babylon format has many attributes which is far more advanced if you want to export scenes. However, if you are only importing meshes, the the OBJ format is by far the most reliable format and provides a level of flexibility in being able to edit the ascii files directly. Once you open the OBJ and MTL files and spend a couple minutes editing these and learning what values represent the different attributes, this will become your format of choice for meshes. I can't imagine otherwise, as there is little to nothing which will cause you problems once you understand the format. Remember that you can always apply Babylon materials and textures (and other attributes such as shaders) after import - which I do often.
    I hope this info helps, as you're definitely on the right path to the ease of importing OBJ files. If you read this and follow the advice to test a few edits to the files, I can't imagine you won't have a firm grasp of the OBJ format. However, if you still have issues, then post an OBJ, MTL, and JPG file all with the same name before the extension, and I'll be happy to walk you through the key lines to edit to gain full control over the resulting mesh(s) import.
    FYI - I introduced the other software engineers at Sony Electronics to the OBJ format, and it is now the format of choice for practically all mesh content due to it's simplicity and flexibility. This is after they spent several months working will every other format and exporter. No need to over complicate simple tasks - which often happens due to the OBJ format being decades old now; so people assume newer formats are better. But there's a reason why the OBJ format continues to be the most widely used in export/import between most applications.
    Cheers,
    DB
  5. Like
    dbawel got a reaction from bghgary in Error on loading .OBJ files   
    @Madclaws -
    Firstly, your file names don't match, so unless you have edited the OBJ and MTL files yourself, the loader is looking for the same name MTL file. Start by opening your OBJ file in any text editor, and verify the name of the .mtl file the .obj file is looking for. This will be in one of the first few lines of the OBJ file. As it appears the OBJ file is looking for a different MTL file name, this is not normal. It;s always best to keep your OBJ, MTL, and JPG (texture file) the same name as every exporter I've ever used writes these as the same name; and looks for the same name files on import - definitely the Babylon OBJ file importer. And your OBJ manifest file and MTL file are of different names. So I might assume your other files are not matching the names precisely. Upper case and lower case must match also.
    You don't need a manifest file... however, if you want to get rid of the 404 error for the manifest file, simply create an empty file with the same name as your OBJ file, and give it the extension .manifest. Example 'obj_name.babylon.manifest'. However, this is not important as others have already stated. If you're loading multiple OBJ files, then I recommend editing your OBJ file and remove the reference to the .manifest file. Then it won't look for the file. 
    As for the .mtl file, this must also have the same name as the obj file. Example 'obj_name.mtl'. This is your material file with all your material attributes (settings.) This will work the same way if your mesh has a texture which will also have the same name as your obj file with an extension for the texture such as 'obj_name,jpg'. 
    I work with OBJ files every day, and almost always edit the OBJ and MTL files as they are self explanatory once you open in a text editor. If you don't want a MTL file on your mesh, then simply remove the reference to the MTL file in your OBJ file. Then it will simply use a default material or none at all depending on your OBJ file edit. However, I find that different applications such as Blender often write odd values to the MTL file which is completely dependent on the user who has set up the material and texture. So I almost always edit my OBJ and MTL files as I can get the desired material editing the ambient, diffuse, specular values, etc. directly in the ascii files themselves. It's so very easy to read and edit. 2 minutes experimenting with no prior knowledge is more time than anyone needs to learn everything there is to know about the OBJ format - including editing normals, vertices, etc.
    It's simple for a single OBJ file, but if you work with real time scans producing hundreds of unique OBJ files to load in real time, then I write simple scripts to edit each OBJ file as needed. The .babylon format has many attributes which is far more advanced if you want to export scenes. However, if you are only importing meshes, the the OBJ format is by far the most reliable format and provides a level of flexibility in being able to edit the ascii files directly. Once you open the OBJ and MTL files and spend a couple minutes editing these and learning what values represent the different attributes, this will become your format of choice for meshes. I can't imagine otherwise, as there is little to nothing which will cause you problems once you understand the format. Remember that you can always apply Babylon materials and textures (and other attributes such as shaders) after import - which I do often.
    I hope this info helps, as you're definitely on the right path to the ease of importing OBJ files. If you read this and follow the advice to test a few edits to the files, I can't imagine you won't have a firm grasp of the OBJ format. However, if you still have issues, then post an OBJ, MTL, and JPG file all with the same name before the extension, and I'll be happy to walk you through the key lines to edit to gain full control over the resulting mesh(s) import.
    FYI - I introduced the other software engineers at Sony Electronics to the OBJ format, and it is now the format of choice for practically all mesh content due to it's simplicity and flexibility. This is after they spent several months working will every other format and exporter. No need to over complicate simple tasks - which often happens due to the OBJ format being decades old now; so people assume newer formats are better. But there's a reason why the OBJ format continues to be the most widely used in export/import between most applications.
    Cheers,
    DB
  6. Like
    dbawel got a reaction from Deltakosh in Error on loading .OBJ files   
    @Madclaws -
    Firstly, your file names don't match, so unless you have edited the OBJ and MTL files yourself, the loader is looking for the same name MTL file. Start by opening your OBJ file in any text editor, and verify the name of the .mtl file the .obj file is looking for. This will be in one of the first few lines of the OBJ file. As it appears the OBJ file is looking for a different MTL file name, this is not normal. It;s always best to keep your OBJ, MTL, and JPG (texture file) the same name as every exporter I've ever used writes these as the same name; and looks for the same name files on import - definitely the Babylon OBJ file importer. And your OBJ manifest file and MTL file are of different names. So I might assume your other files are not matching the names precisely. Upper case and lower case must match also.
    You don't need a manifest file... however, if you want to get rid of the 404 error for the manifest file, simply create an empty file with the same name as your OBJ file, and give it the extension .manifest. Example 'obj_name.babylon.manifest'. However, this is not important as others have already stated. If you're loading multiple OBJ files, then I recommend editing your OBJ file and remove the reference to the .manifest file. Then it won't look for the file. 
    As for the .mtl file, this must also have the same name as the obj file. Example 'obj_name.mtl'. This is your material file with all your material attributes (settings.) This will work the same way if your mesh has a texture which will also have the same name as your obj file with an extension for the texture such as 'obj_name,jpg'. 
    I work with OBJ files every day, and almost always edit the OBJ and MTL files as they are self explanatory once you open in a text editor. If you don't want a MTL file on your mesh, then simply remove the reference to the MTL file in your OBJ file. Then it will simply use a default material or none at all depending on your OBJ file edit. However, I find that different applications such as Blender often write odd values to the MTL file which is completely dependent on the user who has set up the material and texture. So I almost always edit my OBJ and MTL files as I can get the desired material editing the ambient, diffuse, specular values, etc. directly in the ascii files themselves. It's so very easy to read and edit. 2 minutes experimenting with no prior knowledge is more time than anyone needs to learn everything there is to know about the OBJ format - including editing normals, vertices, etc.
    It's simple for a single OBJ file, but if you work with real time scans producing hundreds of unique OBJ files to load in real time, then I write simple scripts to edit each OBJ file as needed. The .babylon format has many attributes which is far more advanced if you want to export scenes. However, if you are only importing meshes, the the OBJ format is by far the most reliable format and provides a level of flexibility in being able to edit the ascii files directly. Once you open the OBJ and MTL files and spend a couple minutes editing these and learning what values represent the different attributes, this will become your format of choice for meshes. I can't imagine otherwise, as there is little to nothing which will cause you problems once you understand the format. Remember that you can always apply Babylon materials and textures (and other attributes such as shaders) after import - which I do often.
    I hope this info helps, as you're definitely on the right path to the ease of importing OBJ files. If you read this and follow the advice to test a few edits to the files, I can't imagine you won't have a firm grasp of the OBJ format. However, if you still have issues, then post an OBJ, MTL, and JPG file all with the same name before the extension, and I'll be happy to walk you through the key lines to edit to gain full control over the resulting mesh(s) import.
    FYI - I introduced the other software engineers at Sony Electronics to the OBJ format, and it is now the format of choice for practically all mesh content due to it's simplicity and flexibility. This is after they spent several months working will every other format and exporter. No need to over complicate simple tasks - which often happens due to the OBJ format being decades old now; so people assume newer formats are better. But there's a reason why the OBJ format continues to be the most widely used in export/import between most applications.
    Cheers,
    DB
  7. Like
    dbawel got a reaction from DylanD in Custom Preloader Progress and Hiding Meshes   
    @Wingnut -
    I never know how to respond to you, as you are under the disillusion that I have any clue as to what I'm doing. Yes, I did get very lucky to have been able to work on some great movies and games, but trust me - I was one of the lucky ones. I only wish I had the experience in Web languages that you and others have on this forum, and am only able to give advise on a narrow band of subjects - or the basics of working in BJS and WebGL, only because of my work in OpenGL. 
    But thank you for the PR - as I'm all for getting respect - even if it's not deserving. Wingman, you're my buddy, and I'll always respect the help you provide myself and others here on this forum. Again, thanks for the over-qualified applause, and perhaps I might even be up to assisting you with a project one day.
    Cheers my Friend,
    David
  8. Like
    dbawel got a reaction from DylanD in Animation Curves   
    @DylanD
    I just delivered two games to Sony, and it is far better to set your (x,y,z,) points in space within the Babylon world space. I found ways to import curves, but what's the point. You have far more flexibility doing it all in Babylon.
     If you need more info on this, I'm happy to help if I have the time.
    DB
  9. Like
    dbawel got a reaction from Tomek in Pick a point in the space with mouse.   
    I don't know if this might apply, however for a recent app, I used the (X,Y) canvas pick point to pass through, and set a separate control (mouse wheel, keypad) to set a dynamic Z distance from the camera in world space. This simple function allowed me to draw vertices and create meshes in three dimensions quickly and easily. I also drew a line from my camera to the (X,Y,Z) world space coordinate as a visual reference with a simple icon attached to the end point on the selected position to allow easier navigation. And for my app's specific needs, I provided a numeric Z depth reading in the UI with limits so that the user could set restrictions on Z depth (as well as X,Y world space, to provide a useful, selectable, and accurate determination of where to select to place mesh attributes.
    DB
  10. Like
    dbawel got a reaction from Tomek in Pick a point in the space with mouse.   
    Hi @Tomek
    My apologies - I haven't been on the forum much these past few weeks. If you would still like an example of this, then I expect to be able to set up a simple scene which accomplishes this.I have an insurmountable amount of work backlogged, but need to move back into the community. I'll try and let you know if I'm not able to get to this tomorrow; as it won't take long to build.
    DB
  11. Like
    dbawel got a reaction from Wingnut in Pick a point in the space with mouse.   
    I don't know if this might apply, however for a recent app, I used the (X,Y) canvas pick point to pass through, and set a separate control (mouse wheel, keypad) to set a dynamic Z distance from the camera in world space. This simple function allowed me to draw vertices and create meshes in three dimensions quickly and easily. I also drew a line from my camera to the (X,Y,Z) world space coordinate as a visual reference with a simple icon attached to the end point on the selected position to allow easier navigation. And for my app's specific needs, I provided a numeric Z depth reading in the UI with limits so that the user could set restrictions on Z depth (as well as X,Y world space, to provide a useful, selectable, and accurate determination of where to select to place mesh attributes.
    DB
  12. Like
    dbawel got a reaction from Boz in How big of a terrain to balance performance + appearance on low-end machines?   
    Hey @jdavid
    It's all in the math. Look at the least common hardware you want to support, and do an evaluation of vertices, materials, and textures. Always use a power 2 texture until we enter full support of WebGL 2.0. I always look at my code as a water pipe and a bathtub... how much water can I push through the pipe and how much water can the bathtub hold?
    DB
  13. Like
    dbawel got a reaction from JackFalcon in I Love This Forum   
    Ah.. @Wingnut -
    You're always good for a laugh!😆 He has a re-shoot next week, and I'm going to try and make the shoot if I can work out the logistics. The only thing that might keep me away is that I'm scheduled for the G2E show in Vegas next week; so we'll see how it goes.
    Anyway, if I get a picture with the Captain, you know the first place I'm going to post it.
     
    On a different note (no pun intended), I'm waiting on FedEx to deliver my new keyboard this morning. It truly looks like a science station right off the bridge of the Enterprise. I mention this as it's the perfect workstation to compose and record music for online content. Here's a You Tube video:
    For those of you who write and record their own music for their games, there is no better keyboard out there. It runs Cubase natively, and has features that have never been seen before. I usually run Pro Tools, but I can run either on this board without the need for my laptop - or any MIDI or analog interface for all the channels of audio I choose. There's even a driver which converts all applicable performances and sounds to Web Audio, so that I can use a tone generator without the need for downloading audio files. I'm truly psyched!
    DB
  14. Like
    dbawel got a reaction from jerome in I Love This Forum   
    Ah.. @Wingnut -
    You're always good for a laugh!😆 He has a re-shoot next week, and I'm going to try and make the shoot if I can work out the logistics. The only thing that might keep me away is that I'm scheduled for the G2E show in Vegas next week; so we'll see how it goes.
    Anyway, if I get a picture with the Captain, you know the first place I'm going to post it.
     
    On a different note (no pun intended), I'm waiting on FedEx to deliver my new keyboard this morning. It truly looks like a science station right off the bridge of the Enterprise. I mention this as it's the perfect workstation to compose and record music for online content. Here's a You Tube video:
    For those of you who write and record their own music for their games, there is no better keyboard out there. It runs Cubase natively, and has features that have never been seen before. I usually run Pro Tools, but I can run either on this board without the need for my laptop - or any MIDI or analog interface for all the channels of audio I choose. There's even a driver which converts all applicable performances and sounds to Web Audio, so that I can use a tone generator without the need for downloading audio files. I'm truly psyched!
    DB
  15. Like
    dbawel got a reaction from trevordev in I Love This Forum   
    Ah.. @Wingnut -
    You're always good for a laugh!😆 He has a re-shoot next week, and I'm going to try and make the shoot if I can work out the logistics. The only thing that might keep me away is that I'm scheduled for the G2E show in Vegas next week; so we'll see how it goes.
    Anyway, if I get a picture with the Captain, you know the first place I'm going to post it.
     
    On a different note (no pun intended), I'm waiting on FedEx to deliver my new keyboard this morning. It truly looks like a science station right off the bridge of the Enterprise. I mention this as it's the perfect workstation to compose and record music for online content. Here's a You Tube video:
    For those of you who write and record their own music for their games, there is no better keyboard out there. It runs Cubase natively, and has features that have never been seen before. I usually run Pro Tools, but I can run either on this board without the need for my laptop - or any MIDI or analog interface for all the channels of audio I choose. There's even a driver which converts all applicable performances and sounds to Web Audio, so that I can use a tone generator without the need for downloading audio files. I'm truly psyched!
    DB
  16. Like
    dbawel got a reaction from JohnK in I Love This Forum   
    Ah.. @Wingnut -
    You're always good for a laugh!😆 He has a re-shoot next week, and I'm going to try and make the shoot if I can work out the logistics. The only thing that might keep me away is that I'm scheduled for the G2E show in Vegas next week; so we'll see how it goes.
    Anyway, if I get a picture with the Captain, you know the first place I'm going to post it.
     
    On a different note (no pun intended), I'm waiting on FedEx to deliver my new keyboard this morning. It truly looks like a science station right off the bridge of the Enterprise. I mention this as it's the perfect workstation to compose and record music for online content. Here's a You Tube video:
    For those of you who write and record their own music for their games, there is no better keyboard out there. It runs Cubase natively, and has features that have never been seen before. I usually run Pro Tools, but I can run either on this board without the need for my laptop - or any MIDI or analog interface for all the channels of audio I choose. There's even a driver which converts all applicable performances and sounds to Web Audio, so that I can use a tone generator without the need for downloading audio files. I'm truly psyched!
    DB
  17. Like
    dbawel got a reaction from Deltakosh in I Love This Forum   
    Ah.. @Wingnut -
    You're always good for a laugh!😆 He has a re-shoot next week, and I'm going to try and make the shoot if I can work out the logistics. The only thing that might keep me away is that I'm scheduled for the G2E show in Vegas next week; so we'll see how it goes.
    Anyway, if I get a picture with the Captain, you know the first place I'm going to post it.
     
    On a different note (no pun intended), I'm waiting on FedEx to deliver my new keyboard this morning. It truly looks like a science station right off the bridge of the Enterprise. I mention this as it's the perfect workstation to compose and record music for online content. Here's a You Tube video:
    For those of you who write and record their own music for their games, there is no better keyboard out there. It runs Cubase natively, and has features that have never been seen before. I usually run Pro Tools, but I can run either on this board without the need for my laptop - or any MIDI or analog interface for all the channels of audio I choose. There's even a driver which converts all applicable performances and sounds to Web Audio, so that I can use a tone generator without the need for downloading audio files. I'm truly psyched!
    DB
  18. Haha
    dbawel reacted to Wingnut in I Love This Forum   
    Ahh, Billy Shatnoid... you bet.  I worked with him in a movie called "The Wrath of Chaka Khan".     (not)
    These days, he's pretty anti-drooling-over-him, and I can understand that.  I know he likes questions such as "How do you think the world came into existence?" and "Do you think life is a dream/hallucination, fooling our 5 senses?" 
    Really.  He is quite sick of questions from "the neutral zone". 
    My buddy that does video production for horse events in Lexington, KY area... says he sees Bill and Elizabeth attending various horse shows and socials.  They're "into" horses.  That might be another good subject to converse-about.  And, you know, food.  Ask him to tell you about his finest meals.  I bet he'll start rattling-on.  Get him to reminisce about the funnest things he has done, and listen well.
    He might give you a horse!  (You REALLY wanted a StarFleet shuttle craft, though, right?  *nod*)
    This is a goofy thread. 
  19. Like
    dbawel got a reaction from V!nc3r in I Love This Forum   
    Hey Devs and All,
    I'm just feeling a bit sentimental about how far this forum has come the past 4 years. @Deltakosh and @davrous  ( + others) have given us a creative outlet that has turned into a new frontier. I just wanted to say how much I appreciate that I am able to come to a place that provides me not only technical advice, but I've made many new friends as well. Much love to you all.
    DB
  20. Like
    dbawel got a reaction from mizuwu in I Love This Forum   
    Hey Devs and All,
    I'm just feeling a bit sentimental about how far this forum has come the past 4 years. @Deltakosh and @davrous  ( + others) have given us a creative outlet that has turned into a new frontier. I just wanted to say how much I appreciate that I am able to come to a place that provides me not only technical advice, but I've made many new friends as well. Much love to you all.
    DB
  21. Like
    dbawel got a reaction from DylanD in I Love This Forum   
    Hello all...
    Unfortunately due to traffic, I didn't arrive on the lot in time to make my lunch appointment. I was totally bummed, however my new Producer for 3rd Brain Technologies Janet Arlotta has a re-shoot with him in about a week. And this time, I'll be there with bells on.🔔 Not going to stand up Captain Kirk twice.
    @Deltakosh - good question! I've got to ask if he's using Babylon.js. I can't believe I didn't think of this one!
    Cheers,
    DB
  22. Like
    dbawel got a reaction from DylanD in I Love This Forum   
    I get to meet and hang out with William Shatner this Wednesday... just me and him... WhoooHoooo! I've lived quite a life... the original Starship captain...
    Anyone have any questions I should ask?
    DB
  23. Like
    dbawel got a reaction from jdavid in How big of a terrain to balance performance + appearance on low-end machines?   
    @jdavid -
    So are you good? Able to move forward?
    DB
  24. Like
    dbawel got a reaction from Deltakosh in I Love This Forum   
    Hello all...
    Unfortunately due to traffic, I didn't arrive on the lot in time to make my lunch appointment. I was totally bummed, however my new Producer for 3rd Brain Technologies Janet Arlotta has a re-shoot with him in about a week. And this time, I'll be there with bells on.🔔 Not going to stand up Captain Kirk twice.
    @Deltakosh - good question! I've got to ask if he's using Babylon.js. I can't believe I didn't think of this one!
    Cheers,
    DB
  25. Like
    dbawel got a reaction from JackFalcon in I Love This Forum   
    Hey Devs and All,
    I'm just feeling a bit sentimental about how far this forum has come the past 4 years. @Deltakosh and @davrous  ( + others) have given us a creative outlet that has turned into a new frontier. I just wanted to say how much I appreciate that I am able to come to a place that provides me not only technical advice, but I've made many new friends as well. Much love to you all.
    DB