nrd

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  1. hi, very cool game. tried it in firefox. it took me something like 20 clicks on the practice button within 5 minutes to start practice mode. i wrote "test" in the chat only once. there are a few visual glitches: the white things on the course map. later when i switched between tabs it began to show the 3dish green grid on the course with the many white dots. if i had a free wish i'd ask for having no physical mouse challenge at all. let me set the shot power etc like in a normal gui. i know you try to reflect the physical challenge a golf player has. and probably there's 10 other golf games doing it the same way. but my initial thought was that your game would be great if it was only looking, thinking and deciding.
  2. nrd

    Cliclock

    but you need to know how much to adjust. maybe a -1s..0..1s gauge or clock face would make it easier
  3. nrd

    Cliclock

    97% + 3 perfect clicks beat this
  4. can you add right-mouse-button to boost? liking it.. but i feel bad shooting at others tbh
  5. thanks so much for the cheering words. and again i had missed these points totally.. it's pre-alpha. and i'm really thinking hard whether it could be fun. i doubted it and therefore didn't like to go on.
  6. looks great, though i don't visually like the shadows sticking to objects (cart, pencil). i noticed the configurator reacts on any mouse position and probably moves the camera, and it makes sense. but i'd still visually prefer moving just the object, the light source should stay.
  7. My main pillow fight problem has become that I'm a bad player at any game. It seems senseless to go on, I wouldn't know how to create a thrilling game for those who are good at playing games.
  8. Thanks a lot. The idea that players themselves check (some) validity of other players actions was completely new to me. The link is a great help, too. According to the article I have (unknowingly) started with a snapshot-technique (in my prototype the player objects repeatedly do: snapshot, then step 1 of lockstep), which the author recommends for large player counts (and beside that for non-deterministic physics). I think I'm doing the snapshots to later save server traffic for out-of-reach-phases (times when distance between two players is too big for interaction, which would be the blog authors non-determinism maybe). Maybe that's why it's good for large player counts. Didn't really really read it. He recommends UDP, which for HTML5 would be WebRTC and brings me into trouble. (Slither.io doesn't use it, does it?) Kind regards
  9. I try to improve my question. I think it might be a good idea to remove the premise. Then there would exist cheaters, and then finally I'd prefer to say the server has to handle the pillows fully. It would always calculate their physics. And in the development process, when I start making the clients calculate the physics too (which should look smoother than transmitted positions), then I could - but don't have to - free the server from calculations if they are not needed (for other clients etc). In short: Neutral objects: At first the server here handles everything. Later: try to make physics look smooth in the browser. Even later: try to optimize the server performance. I'm new to the subject, still knowing virtually nothing.
  10. I've never played an addicting game in my life. But I admit having searched through the images in seasons of sakura for something like a day. I'm actually handicapped and I wish I could substitute this by the ability to play games in a way so they are addicting to me. I have no idea why this wouldn't the most fun ever. I like the idea of civil disobedience @ programmers and military.
  11. Thank you for the help! I've looked at digital ocean and it was a perfect match for me. The browser console, to be more precisely, the programs started in the browser console stay forever and one can connect to the terminal always. This working is so cool, and SSD disk space for the price is great. I'm looking/reading about the mentioned alternatives a bit.
  12. Hi, can you tell me how you would solve this? Imagine you would want to create a pillow fight game. There are 30 or more pillows, and about the same amount of players. I have one premise: Everyone is no cheater. Everyone is good and there is no hacking and no AI-bots either. My concerns are about saving resources and having a good approach in general. I've made one decision already: The players send their positions and input. That was an easy one. Due to the premise (all are good), I just trust them, and it's ad-hoc. But where should the pillows be handled, where are their positions stored? My first ideas are: 1) Server does everything. It accepts input that will move pillows (e.g. player throws a pillow) and it computes the current position of all pillows. 2) Clients (players computers) do everything. They ask the server for the right to calculate and decide pillow positions/speeds of pillows near the player. 3) Mixture of 1 and 2, especially "the Server will only broadcast certain decicions (pick up, throw) and turning points (pillow from now on just falls or so, server can calculate the position very easily from now on) I have no really appealing approach. In fact I hate the problem so much that there will be no pillow fight game for now. (my actual game would differ, but I think If i knew how I would write a pillow fight game, I'd knew enough for the other game I think of)
  13. Hi, can you recommend a hosting service to run a WebSocket server? I think I would choose "uWS" as programming framework. For the hosting I have no Idea what to look for. Ideally there would be virtually no way for my bank account to go into depts. Kind regards