Julz57

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  1. Phaser 3 Beta 4 Released

    @richLove the "3D" engine capacity. You could very easily convert this to stereo view if linked to LCD glasses. Simply by shifting camera offset a little to the left and then back a little to the right would give the changes in retinal correspondence that the visual cortex would detect as depth, aka 3D stereo. A fps of 60 would be acceptable but obviously the higher the better. It would be soooo amazing! So all 2D games can become "3D" with minimal change in coding! I am a newbie when it comes to coding and don't even have LCD glasses. BUT I am a retired optometrist and would be happy to help if you need advice on what to do. It would create an entire new genre of games with little to no coding once the basic set up is integrated into Phaser 3. A bit like how you can now choose your style of Physics (Arcade vs other options). So i would not be apologetic that it is not true 3D because you now have the mechanics built in to be a leader in this area. Go Phaser 3! Need API's and other stuff that I have no idea about to talk to the LED glasses but would think that is available somewhere. Wow just thought about training software for students, mechanics, company demos where people have to see it to understand it. A fricking huge potential market on top of true 3D stereo games! I would also love to be involved to use this concept for therapeutic purposes for treatment of lazy eyes. Here to help if I can.
  2. Game cycle, FPS and optomisation

    @Antriel Yes agree with above but just want to say current specs are a dream compared to what was used in the outset.
  3. Game cycle, FPS and optomisation

    @Antriel What you say may be currently true as I do not know enough about current technologies. But in days gone by stereoscopic presentations were done using the alternate eye presentation method on Apple IIe and Commodore Amiga when fps were very slow! You are showing your age, but even worse, I am showing mine. lol. PAL CRT TV's were used as monitors which is a rather sad memory. But we were excited at the time even though the images / animations were blocky and rough (opposite of smooth?). Images were above CFF albeit a bit liable to breakdown at times. The coarseness was viewed as a positive in therapeutic applications as it reduced the likelihood of reducing the lazy eye from suppressing and shutting down.
  4. Game cycle, FPS and optomisation

    @mattstylesYes it is even a bit more complicated than the information thus far. Our peripheral field is absolutely critical for spatial localisation, orientation and mobility. So poor performance in this area will cause motion sickness, nausea, poor spatial awareness leading to basically a crap experience. This may be magnified by ocular motor control disorders for people with latent turns (can be measured clinically but not apparent to a patient apart from fatigue and other functional issues), turned or lazy eyes. The setting of the primary fixation point for direct ahead viewing also needs to be calibrated for each eye for optimum results. And then add on top of this that the interior surface display contour must match the normal perception of a viewer when the eye is rotated off axis (ie left, right up down) or further spatial perception disruption is possible. But having said all of the above the brain is highly plastic when it comes to some aspects of visual processing and integration of information from the two eyes. Think of a great accountant managing your books and doing your tax! So when first putting VR units on it feels strange but we typically adapt rather quickly to the new visual inputs. Likewise there is a bit of re-adadptation when the units are removed. Enjoy!
  5. Game cycle, FPS and optomisation

    @Legomite "What? VR applications needs 120 fps to be a decent VR experience. You can clearly see above 60 FPS, as there are monitors using a 120hz refresh (refreshes 120 times per second) which makes 120 fps incredibly smooth compared to 60 hz monitors (which are most screens). 60 FPS in VR would cause motion sickness " Hi Legomite, I think there is a difference in definitions here. Critical Fusion Frequency is the rate of presentation at which the eye cannot discern that an object is turning off and then on and off and on,..... So the 60FPS is well above this value centrally. 3D Stereo TV's use LED glasses that switch from left eye to RE and back,,, which the brain fuses into one image. But the frequency of presentation to each eye is half the fps rate (30fps). So if it is controlled by the web browser (60fps) then each eye gets 30fps viewing which it perceives as being stable. Ever notice that fluorescent lights flicker in the peripheral field but look stable when viewed directly? I did mention that the peripheral visual field is an altogether different beast when it comes to detection of movement and change. It is extremely sensitive to these so a higher Critical Fusion Frequency is required to stop it from being strobe like. And on top of that the possible range of angular movement is much greater making peripheral movement blocky or segmented without very high fps. Up to 220 degrees from one edge to the other whereas as central field is about 30 degrees wide. So the fps needs for VR for full field stimulation are much higher as you correctly note. Central only VR does not need as much as we know watching 3D on TV using LED glasses.
  6. Game cycle, FPS and optomisation

    Thanks @samme and @mattstyles Yes that makes sense now. I cannot see the point of increasing the refresh rate which is currently 60fps as per @samme . As a retired optometrist the eye cannot resolve anything more than about 25-30 fps in the central field as the information blurs into a smooth perception. Having 60 fps is therefore adequate for VR applications using the internet. Going any faster will not improve the smoothness. This may still become an issue if we go to super field screens with ultra ultra ultra high resolution where even 60fps (30fps in VR mode) may show up as jagged movement. This is more likely to occur in the peripheral field which is where the neural pathways and receptors are geared primarily to identifying change or movement. The critical fusion frequency there is much higher than the central visual field where our screens are currently located. It may be in your lifetime but doubt it in mine. lol from an old bastard who has the pleasure of being retired and currently slack as.
  7. Game cycle, FPS and optomisation

    I think I posted this into the wrong section before. Hope I am correct now. and yes a noob. ======= hi, Been reading about basic game function, engine, cycles, FPS and refresh rate and now wondering how Phaser manages all of these, if at all. Game design is usually enabled so that the game cycle and FPS do not interfere with other too much so code works the same (aka similar playability but with varying graphical experiences) for different systems of ranging capacity. But I have not read anything about this optimisation for Phaser games. Is this because the frame rate is controlled by refresh rate of the web browser used by the player and therefore out of design control? I have been reading Phaser game code on different sites and nowhere have I seen this optimisation implemented. While surfing I actually came across a site with a series of playable examples and associated coding (minor snippets really and minimal graphics) which seemed to stall and were jerky during play. This was in stark contrast to all my other experiences with Phaser code examples. I was using a Samsung Tab A at the time. So the question above came to mind much later as the dust was settling after a session of hunting out information. So how does Phaser deal with the above and optimisation for a multitude of systems of varying capacity? Does it 'sleep' in between cycles when CPU calculations are not required to conserve battery power? Thanks
  8. hi, Been reading about basic game function, engine, cycles, FPS and refresh rate and now wondering how Phaser manages all of these, if at all. Game design is usually enabled so that the game cycle and FPS do not interfere with other too much so code works the same (aka similar playability but with varying graphical experiences) for different systems of ranging capacity. But I have not read anything about this optimisation for Phaser games. Is this because the frame rate is controlled by refresh rate of the web browser used by the player and therefore out of design control? I have been reading Phaser game code on different sites and nowhere have I seen this optimisation implemented. While surfing I actually came across a site with a series of playable examples and associated coding (minor snippets really and minimal graphics) which seemed to stall and were jerky during play. This was in stark contrast to all my other experiences with Phaser code examples. I was using a Samsung Tab A at the time. So the question above came to mind much later as the dust was settling after a session of hunting out information. So how does Phaser deal with the above and optimisation for a multitude of systems of varying capacity? Does it 'sleep' in between cycles when CPU calculations are not required to conserve battery power? Thanks
  9. What is TypeScript? And other matters

    @samid737 Thanks. yes I have been reviewing all the examples at Phaser.io as well as others on different websites. The graphics tinting of sprites and background colour changes are probably the two greatest options in Phaser for the required games. Thinking they will be super fast especially given that most sprites will be grouped as well. Only a palette of 4 colours which I am sure can be further optimised at some stage if need be. Some of the game examples are also awesome and easily adapted to my needs. Thanks for the offer of help. I like trying to do things on my own which is good and bad. Sometimes it is just getting my foot into the door before it closes. And hopefully it doesn't close too fast and break my toes. LOL. Sometimes I feel so close to being there and next it is like I am in a different country. Having no formal training in coding makes things interesting at times. My profession was the antithesis of that of a programmer but then logic is logic. I am currently learning the language let alone the rules. Delphi coding was relatively easy for me as the rules were VERY flexible. I could fudge my way through it all! One of my other problems is that I am using a laptop that died during its last Windows 10 update and I have installed Linux Lite to have something while travelling. Making everything just a little more awkward as not sure of the set up processes for installing programs etc. Linux and Windows OS are like chalk and cheese. Windows is the chalk but its taste is familiar so I have adapted to it. But will be home soon and this time will be used for reading as much as possible about Phaser coding, games cycles, game logic, game design,..... so not wasted really. Cheers
  10. What is TypeScript? And other matters

    Hi, Thanks for both posts. I went to the link to game mechanics and found it very good. The link there to game design fundamentals was great as well. So thanks for the links. Will use them as a reference and will need to read again to try to fully grasp all the concepts of game mechanics and design. Loved the examples there as well. Yes I keep trying to start, read too much, get confused and repeat the cycle again and again and again. ;( Even tried to load Phaser Editor onto my system but could not get it going with Linux Lite as the OS. Tried the additional commands in the Command line to set it up but keep getting errors. Have already messaged about this and I know it is not your issue here. I am very new to Linux also as I only managed to revive the laptop I am typing on just before heading away for a holiday. I never thought that I would have the good fortune of finding Phaser whilst away. So at least one REAL positive there. So while i try to work things out I think I will fiddle in Sandbox and see what I can do there. So again thanks for the posts. Hand holding of noobs is cherished by the noobs!
  11. @Arian Fornaris Yes I think i just need to get my fingers dirty and get going. Does using the editor allow working with code written in saw TypeScript or other examples posted in tutorials. I am thinking No as all needs to be complied via the Phaser engine but will ask anyway. Thanks again
  12. Ok all, ANOTHER dumb question(s(?)). I keep reading about Phaser, JavaScript, TypeScript and Nodejs and this and that and how all somehow magically integrates with Phaser, compilers and web pages (HTML5) to simplify the programming. Well I am not a magician and I don't even have my outfit yet. Think Harry Potter meeting Hagrid for the first time. I'm Harry and Hagrid is Phaser. Diagon Alley is where these magical tools reside and I'm still waiting for my ticket to catch the Hogwarts Express where all will be revealed. So I'm excited, a little(?) bit unsure and looking forward to learning so much but I haven't even got a single thing for Hogwarts. I do have a Public Library card, aka Google, and have been using it. I'm looking to use Phaser Editor which will simplify things under the bonnet for me. Is that my ticket to Hogwarts? So do I need to worry about the above or just go for it and get my fingers dirty with coding? And then just pick things up along the way as my needs grow? I'm afraid that I could keep procrastinating for ever about my best entry point into Phaser. Help! I think that I have answered my own question but second opinions appreciated. Thanks PS: Anyone from Slytherin need not respond
  13. Hi @Arian Fornaris No I haven't used the editor yet. I always scan through documentation first to get an idea of what, where, how and why. Just an old habit. I tend to get an overview and then jump in. So I saw the exceptions listed in the Phaser editor documentation link that you provided. For example not recognising the '.' and needing to use '_' in some cases for autocompletion. You said it was just an executable file so I can just download it and save in my file system and it will work? Thant sounds just too easy to be true and my kind of installation. This would reduce the fear of the risk of my Linus distro crashing irreparably. I worry about the things that I do not know or understand. Linux and Windows are different executables? Presume yes. Are the help files inbuilt or a separate download? The exceptions listed was in your link why I was interested in Sandbox. Using two tool instead of just one. I really don't think my coding is going to be very complex so perhaps I am worrying about nothing? The most complex aspects will be the HTML API calls to Save and Load/Read files. And from you say this will be simpler in Phaser editor. Only .txt files in any event. Cheers
  14. Hi @samid737 and @samme Yeah, love the page flipping demo.LOL. Last time I programmed a game is was done with page flipping to increase performance but this version is even better.
  15. Thanks again. Have been in contact with Arian and I suspect using both will be the best. This way I can use the auto complete of Sandbox on top of what his editor does. His simple approach to keeping all files together and packaging them will be marvelous for my needs. Both are good products and getting the best of both worlds is the ideal solution. I am nervous about installing his software Editor on my laptop (Linux Lite) as they warn anything not approved by them for their distro can cause a system failure. I had enough trouble just rescuing this laptop from a Windows 10 upgrade so will wait until I get home in 2-3 weeks. Will keep busy reading about HTML and Phaser and also keep going through Phaser examples. Forever learning and having fun(?)