DNIWE

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About DNIWE

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  1. Thank you. I'm not bound to use v4, it's just the latest tag I checked out from repo that looked like a full release rather than rc.
  2. Hello. I'm making example filter with custom fragment shader. This is what I have in terms of shader code so far: //fragShader struct SomeInfo { vec4 color; }; uniform SomeInfo c; void main() { gl_FragColor = c.color; } The idea is to (eventually) make c into an array of Infos, which would be then operated on by the shader. What I'm struggling with is the definition of filter: how do I declare the uniform to be of type SomeInfo in Js code? I assume in plain WebGL, I'd have to bind uniform location (of c's property) by calling gl.getUniformLocation(program, "c.color") and create a uniform with appropriate gl.uniform4f(location, /* bunch of values*/), but can I do something similar via the existing filters means? Relevant part of my Js code looks like this: //Define base filter class for our future shaders/filters PIXI.filters.CustomFilterBase = class CustomFilterBase extends PIXI.Filter { constructor({ vertexSrc = null, fragmentSrc = null, uniforms = {}, enabled = true, debug = false, name = null } = {}) { if(debug && fragmentSrc !== null) { fragmentSrc = "#define DEBUG \r\n" + fragmentSrc; } //Add dimensions for scaling uniforms.dimensions = { type: 'vec2', value: { x: 0.0, y: 0.0 } }; super(vertexSrc, fragmentSrc, uniforms); name ? this._name = name : this._name = "CustomFilterBase"; this.autoFit = false; this.enabled = enabled; } apply(filterManager, input, output) { this.uniforms.dimensions.x = input.sourceFrame.width; this.uniforms.dimensions.y = input.sourceFrame.height; // draw the filter... filterManager.applyFilter(this, input, output); } } //Shader for prototyping and testing PIXI.filters.TestFilter = class TestFilter extends PIXI.filters.CustomFilterBase { constructor() { let fragmentSrc = document.getElementById('fragShader').innerHTML; let uniforms = { //What do I do here?! c: { type: 'vec4', //Judging by GLSL_SINGLE_SETTERS, only GLSL's primitives are recognized value: new Float32Array([0.0, 1.0, 0.0, 1.0]) } }; super({ vertexSrc: null, fragmentSrc: fragmentSrc, uniforms: uniforms, name: 'testfilter' }); } } (using pixijs v4.8.7) The expected result is green screen, as it is if I declare c as vec4 in shader code, but alas the screen is black, hinting on c's value being default constructed / not properly assigned Any help is appreciated, cheers! P.S. I tried to find similar cases from this forum and stackoverflow, but it seems that few people use structs in GLSL code. P.P.S. If it is of any help, I found that PIXI.glCore.shader removes specific characters from uniform's name (which looks like a hotfix rather than a feature) and that in fact one of iterations uniformData's name is 'c.color'. /** * Extracts the uniforms * @class * @memberof PIXI.glCore.shader * @param gl {WebGLRenderingContext} The current WebGL rendering context * @param program {WebGLProgram} The shader program to get the uniforms from * @return uniforms {Object} */ var extractUniforms = function(gl, program) { var uniforms = {}; var totalUniforms = gl.getProgramParameter(program, gl.ACTIVE_UNIFORMS); for (var i = 0; i < totalUniforms; i++) { var uniformData = gl.getActiveUniform(program, i); var name = uniformData.name.replace(/\[.*?\]/, ""); //<----- Here it is!! var type = mapType(gl, uniformData.type ); uniforms[name] = { type:type, size:uniformData.size, location:gl.getUniformLocation(program, name), value:defaultValue(type, uniformData.size) }; } return uniforms; };