b10b

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  1. Like
    b10b got a reaction from hotfeet in ctx.clearRect() not working with Image.   
    @James432213 hi, many issues here, all solvable.
    1) The function named "canvas" rename this and avoid some confusion, call it "init" or similar
    2) doKeyDown function has parameter "e" but references "event" in the switch - be consistent.
    3) the functions doKeyDown, updateCanvas, drawPlayer are scoped "above" the "init" function, so they can have no easy reference to the "canvas" variable defined within "init".  Notice also the name collision of "canvas" if we ignore step 1.  Easy fix is to move these function declarations inside the "init" function.
    4) There's nothing wrong with ctx.clearRect
    Some basics in how to debug your code will be beneficial, in particular the developer console (F12) is great, and using "console.log" can send helpful messages there from your code.  Use that as a start towards watching the flow of your code when it runs, and where things are not actually working as might be expected on a first draft of code.  This will lead to more advanced debugging techniques and more elaborate (and working) code.
  2. Like
    b10b got a reaction from mattstyles in What to do if my game is published without my permission   
    Sorry to hear this, it's frustrating and not uncommon for quality games.  Locking a game will have limited benefit, don't blame yourself.  Practical advice is don't spend more than 5 minutes worrying about it (a DMCA takedown should take less than 5 mins once you've done it a couple of times).  Some additional takeaways are: 1) brand future games in multiple ways so stolen traffic still promotes the author and proper licensing channels, 2) develop server-authoritative or partner-publishing strategies for monetization, 3) offer paying customers more value than what they could achieve by stealing, 4) remember a sequel is quicker for the original author to make - and everyone prefers to play the latest greatest - so if stolen games get traction cash in later.
  3. Like
    b10b got a reaction from James432213 in ctx.clearRect() not working with Image.   
    @James432213 hi, many issues here, all solvable.
    1) The function named "canvas" rename this and avoid some confusion, call it "init" or similar
    2) doKeyDown function has parameter "e" but references "event" in the switch - be consistent.
    3) the functions doKeyDown, updateCanvas, drawPlayer are scoped "above" the "init" function, so they can have no easy reference to the "canvas" variable defined within "init".  Notice also the name collision of "canvas" if we ignore step 1.  Easy fix is to move these function declarations inside the "init" function.
    4) There's nothing wrong with ctx.clearRect
    Some basics in how to debug your code will be beneficial, in particular the developer console (F12) is great, and using "console.log" can send helpful messages there from your code.  Use that as a start towards watching the flow of your code when it runs, and where things are not actually working as might be expected on a first draft of code.  This will lead to more advanced debugging techniques and more elaborate (and working) code.
  4. Like
    b10b reacted to -AAG- in Is it like backstabbing my clients?   
    I want to thank everyone for taking the time to leave a reply. I am taking it all in and think that I might have found a solution that solves this and my level design hate and I may even really like the game(s) that will result from that for a change. 
    I do agree that web games in general are not great and I personally don't play a lot of them. In fact, I feel the same way about native mobile apps and have none installed in any of my devices. I do enjoy how accessible web games are and have found myself surprised by a few of them both when flash was a big deal and now with HTML5. It is this ease of use that I enjoy the most about web games. When It  comes to my own games I have to go with what my clients are looking for. There was a time that my main client wanted arcade games and I made quite a few, not great at all but they got sold and spared me the level design dilemma. Then interest shifted to puzzle games so puzzle games it is and they have been selling.
    I have been doing this for a while and every single game on my catalog has sold multiple licenses (minus the obvious exclusives). I understand that doesn't make them good, that just means my clients liked them and thought them a good addition for their website. I'm sure they know their visitors and I have come to accept that it isn't my concern whether their players like the games or not, but the fact that they continue to buy from me tells me that my work is liked by a certain audience. 
    At the very least I try to make my own thing instead of trying to follow trends or clone this and that because is popular unless the client specifically asks for it. I have avoided plugin to my catalog till now but if anyone wants to take a look you can go over here. 
    Thanks again!
  5. Like
  6. Like
    b10b reacted to mattstyles in I hate designing levels!   
    Procedural generation can be a load of fun, but its a butt-ton of work to get working well.
    You could even use a genetic algorithm (GA) to create levels, have an automated actor play them, test the 'success' of the actor using fitness functions and then loop that process until you get levels (again, based on a heuristic function) that are fun to play. The up-shoot is that you can, potentially, create a near infinite number of levels like this. Or at least generate a manageable amount (say, 30) and manually curate them. Depending on how good your heuristics are you can create levels that are harder or easier for humans to play.
    It's a ton of work though. So depends on your mindset. Some crazy people find that a wonderful coding challenge.
  7. Like
    b10b reacted to -AAG- in I hate designing levels!   
    There! I said it! 😡
     
  8. Like
    b10b reacted to mattstyles in 2D Map Representation as 1D array   
    @b10b yep, thats it exactly. I have a central 'store', which is just a big object, technically you could pass class instances (or functions) through as well but I'm not sure the exact downsides of that (easy serialisation is one, but could be worked around easily enough).
    Re-rendering is a side effect of changes to that central object and will only occur when changes are detected (standard React rendering, which is the same as many true FP languages).
    You could have both systems side-by-side and have a more manual system to 'tell' certain UI elements to that they need to re-render, I've tried that too with varying success.
    I think, in my case at least, I could get a lot of benefits from memoizing some transform functions as I'm effectively running the same thing several times each render tick.
  9. Like
    b10b reacted to Jonny Shaw in Freelancer | Digilocker Design   
    Hi all!

    I've been floating around the forums for a few years now and didn't realise I hadn't posted a plug in here! 🤣

    I'm Jonny Shaw, 35, & a freelance artist & designer, based in West Yorks, England.  I have a background starting in UI design, but more recently have worked in 2D, 3D, animation, sculpting, & development too.

    Lately  I've mainly been working on a lot of casino games, which also led into development with PixiJS, Spine & GSAP.  The last of which ended up being a full game prototype (just minus the comms).

    Always on the lookout for interesting projects, so if you feel like my work may fit the bill, don't hesitate to give me a holla!

    Cheers 🍻

    Jonny Shaw
     
     Website | Facebook | Behance | Artstation
     




     
  10. Like
    b10b reacted to 8Observer8 in Should I use an rendering framework or HTML canvas for game development?   
    I could not choose what to study for coding games and I decided to study these tools:
    Pure WebGL 1.0 and pure WebGL 2.0. I like to study linear math, trigonometry, shader math. I like to study this book which uses pure WebGL and glMatrix: Build your own 2D Game Engine and Create Great Web Games I want to understand how game frameworks works under hood, I mean: Pixi.js, Phaser.js, Three.js, Babylon.js and so on. I like to write very simple clone games like: Snake, Pong, Tetris and so on without game frameworks and game engines. I can use C++ books about OpenGL to study WebGL because WebGL 1.0 is based on OpenGL ES 2.0 (WebGL 2.0 on OpenGL ES 3.0). There are a lot of books and examples in C++ and GLSL that I can translate to WebGL. I can use ThinMatrix video tutorial to study OpenGL using Java and translate his examples to WebGL. I study C# for Unity Game Engine and I write my own simple game engine in C# and OpenGL 3.1 (OpenTK) by rewriting example from this books from deprecated/legacy OpenGL to modern OpenGL: C# Game Programming: For Serious Game Creation This book is a great. It study how to write a good modular architecture and how to develop software using TDD (Test-Driven Development). I like TDD and BDD (Behaviour-Driven Development). I am a fan of these methodologies of software development. I want to rewrite the code from this book to TypeScript/WebGL because TypeScript is very similar to C#. I liked compiled languages like C# and Java. But I study JavaScript 5 (2009) because it is very popular and I will be able to find removed jobs like freelance in the future when I will be a skilled computer graphics and game programmer. Pixi.js and Phaser.js for 2D games. It is very popular frameworks. A lot of works was made. You can write your own shaders in GLSL for these frameworks. Three.js and Babylon.js for 3D games in interactive 3D applications. These are 3D libraries based on WebGL and Canvas API like another popular graphics libraries. You can write shaders for this graphics libraries in GLSL too. Unity Game Engine for 2D and 3D games. I can write WebGL games for Desktop and I can build them for Android, iOS, Desktop (Mac, Window, Linux) to native applications and these native applications will not have browser restrictions. I can write shaders in HLSL and this shader language in very similar to GLSL. I can connect my WebGL, desktop and mobile clients to Node.js server that your Socket.io or WebSockets. For WebGL version I can use pure WebGL frameworks because Unity WebGL build does not work on mobile devices P.S. Sorry for my English. I study it but it is very hard. I did not use Translate Google for writing this message, I wrote this myself.
  11. Like
    b10b got a reaction from 8Observer8 in Should I use an rendering framework or HTML canvas for game development?   
    Also, from a pragmatic view any good rendering library can easily be bolted on to, so beyond the load time there is little disadvantage in adopting one?  For example with CreateJS any DisplayObject can be "cached", which then allows direct access to "cacheCanvas", which can then be directly manipulated (as if it were any other canvas).  An advantage of such a mix-and-match strategy is you decide when to keep inside the library and when to venture beyond ... e.g. in many of my games I utilise library capabilities for basic scene-graph, UI, text etc but will often create a custom renderer (at canvas or shader level) for elaborate HUD components or performance critical game-world graphics.  I try to pick the best library for the project, my preference is CreateJS for non-WebGL lightweight work, and PixiJS for heavier games that can target WebGL or need Spine animation or shaders.
  12. Haha
    b10b reacted to komali2 in Asset management with Spine on the Web   
    Daaaaayum so this worked:
     
    character.skeleton.findSlot('body').sprites['char/body'].texture = PIXI.Texture.from('spine/object/test/body.png'); Arbitrary PNGs can be used, this is even better than we could have hoped for! Thanks very much
  13. Like
    b10b reacted to Swordman821 in Current state of the market   
    Well lets be honest... game development has always been a competitve market. We are passed the days where flash games were insanely popular. HTML5 Game development is a niche market that is not dead by any means. Has it declined in the last decades? Probably, but that does not mean it is dead. Games just keep getting more and more complex, and genre saturation has made players feel "oh this game is like x". In otherwords, players have already played basically all genres of games. Developers need to create games with a certain twist or catalyst in order to market their product.
    I'll admit it was "easier" a decade ago, but the market is always open to new developers with new ideas. Take .io games for example. A relatively new genre of online games that encompasses HTML5 with a solid backend for the Multiplayer aspect. Games like Agar.io, Moomoo.io, Diep.io are whats grabbing the attention. Maybe HTML5 game developers need to pivot more.
  14. Like
    b10b got a reaction from Nagval333 in SICARIO KID - quick-shot duel   
    @Nagval333 I really enjoyed this.  The concept, the style and setting, the music and the pacing - creatively great and well executed.  I got to Level 30 (100+ kills) and it kept me engaged.  If you were looking for suggestions, I'd mention that the upgrade path was initially slow (to the point some players may never achieve a single upgrade?), then seemed to quicken on the second half of upgrades as things became quite easy comparatively.   I'd also mention that finger placement meant I often hid the opponent, so I never really appreciated their variety, their rank, or their reward.  Again, great simple game  
  15. Like
    b10b got a reaction from Esqarrouth in Adsense eCPM on free fall   
    This could be because Programmatic is an auction, so let's look at it from the buyer's perspective.  Ever tried advertising with Google's ad platforms?  Was the quality of their referral traffic good?  Did it convert to genuine customers or anything else of value?  Or was it overhyped and overpriced inventory yielding poor results?   If many Google ad platform customers arrive at a negative conclusion then Demand will drop, and the price will follow.  If we combine this with Supply saturation and autonomous-inventory-trading then the bottom quickly falls out of the market.  Same is equally true with any other non-Google programmatic ad platform (there are other recent posts on this forum showing similar trends on alternative platforms).
    I've always questioned the assumption that Advertisers value placing their ads in generic games - and at ~$0.0004 per impression perhaps the evidence agrees?  Valuable advertising always needs to think differently.
  16. Like
    b10b reacted to ShrewdPixel in Password-less login mechanism   
    I might still be learning some of the canvas libraries, but this stuff is my bread and butter.
    I would seriously caution any devs from designing their own authentication system, even if they are quite knowledgeable on the subject, for a simple reason: even large companies get hacked all the time and they have TONS of resources and dedicated personnel to work on these problems. The only reason smaller startups or freelancers get away with it in the short term is through "Security through obscurity", in other words they are too small to show up on the hacker radar or just haven't made any real enemies yet.  ---- OK, enough warnings and on to the info.
    While what you are planning isn't that bad of an idea, (here's a link to a web service that does just that.) before building your own I'd read up on User Enumeration and Session fixation attacks as well as reading up on answers to this question at security.stackexchange.com (link to this very question being answered here and as well here). The TL;DR for that is that you are introducing a single point of failure, and there are several different ways to exploit it that you probably have not thought of yet.
    It's for this main reason I use other web services for my logins; they have more resources to work out all of the possibilities -- also, if they DO get hacked it's on them and not me or my client.
    It's true that Omni-Auth, which is the "sign-in by third party" mechanism I use, is most popular for signing in with Google or Facebook; but it can actually use MANY different options (See list here). While in the past I've been too busy to add more than Facebook or Google for my own sites, on my next project I'll be adding Twitter, Github, LinkedIn, Instagram, and StackExchange. (If one of those doesn't work for the user or dev, there's still a lot of options.) Most notably, it's still the most secure option available for protecting users and devs.
    I also highly recommend watching Tom Scott's (Computerphile) videos on Youtube for overviews on "Why to never take passwords" and a few others on things like "SQL injection attacks" to get a better overall idea of what exploits can be used against a site and it's users. Watching just the exploits demonstrated on that channel should be enough to scare the hell out of anyone thinking of making their own (or bypassing an) authentication system.
    In summary, while yes you can very well do it, it's almost certainly a bad idea unless you've done a ton of research and thought through every potential possibility. But if it's for a very small site that really doesn't need much security, you can probably get away with it. Just keep in mind that if your site/game does get really successful or gains a huge user base, you'll be scrambling to replace it with something more robust and your users may not react well to the change.
    I certainly hope I've at least provided some useful information on this topic. Good Luck!
  17. Like
    b10b got a reaction from updeadup in Why some portals pay for game and some just steal it?   
    Fair question.  I'd guess stealing appeals to chancers who don't follow commercial concepts like value creation or market positioning?  It might appear to cost less initially, but rarely will it be as worthwhile as a legitimate source ...
    Whereas Licensees are in business and will have identified their supply and demand channels.  They may request customizations from Licensors that can generate value specific to their business model.  For web-games a simple example could be in-game ads, or a more-games link - and more complex examples would be proprietary (requiring partners with high professionalism and integrity).  Responsibilities are defined within the License (negotiated by either party prior to agreement) so mutual benefit is usually the goal.
  18. Like
    b10b got a reaction from blackmoondev in Questions about HTML5 game market form out-of-the-loop guy   
    Hi @Kevin Trepanier,
    From a FGL-Flash-era comparison the big changes are HTML5's shift towards revenue-split, syndication, multi-platform, multi-player.  A good Publishing Partner (who can bring high volume traffic and share revenues fairly) is good to have but might take time (and a small catalog of games) to find?
    Sponsors.  The "Auction" exclusive-upfront-fee licenses are rare (or rather the level of risk for a small team to build a game of sufficient scope to gain exclusive interest is hard to justify upfront).  The "Gameshop" style non-exclusive upfront-fee licenses do exist, however the number of active sponsors in the market are few so overall revenue is limited (in comparison to slower but longer revenue-split).  There are links on this forum to such sponsor portals, although it's a changing list with high churn so your own research will be necessary.
    Virality.  As always, it's possible but improbable!  But more contagious these days is the speed and quantity of rip-offs and clones.  Any big-idea must be protected with (or leverage) a server-side strategy.
    Of course everybody's mileage will vary, most will quietly stall whereas a few successes are very real and highly deserved (and often humble!).  I hope that's a fair and helpful overview.
      
  19. Like
    b10b got a reaction from webdva in Questions about HTML5 game market form out-of-the-loop guy   
    Hi @Kevin Trepanier,
    From a FGL-Flash-era comparison the big changes are HTML5's shift towards revenue-split, syndication, multi-platform, multi-player.  A good Publishing Partner (who can bring high volume traffic and share revenues fairly) is good to have but might take time (and a small catalog of games) to find?
    Sponsors.  The "Auction" exclusive-upfront-fee licenses are rare (or rather the level of risk for a small team to build a game of sufficient scope to gain exclusive interest is hard to justify upfront).  The "Gameshop" style non-exclusive upfront-fee licenses do exist, however the number of active sponsors in the market are few so overall revenue is limited (in comparison to slower but longer revenue-split).  There are links on this forum to such sponsor portals, although it's a changing list with high churn so your own research will be necessary.
    Virality.  As always, it's possible but improbable!  But more contagious these days is the speed and quantity of rip-offs and clones.  Any big-idea must be protected with (or leverage) a server-side strategy.
    Of course everybody's mileage will vary, most will quietly stall whereas a few successes are very real and highly deserved (and often humble!).  I hope that's a fair and helpful overview.
      
  20. Like
    b10b got a reaction from Horizonicblue in Questions about HTML5 game market form out-of-the-loop guy   
    Hi @Kevin Trepanier,
    From a FGL-Flash-era comparison the big changes are HTML5's shift towards revenue-split, syndication, multi-platform, multi-player.  A good Publishing Partner (who can bring high volume traffic and share revenues fairly) is good to have but might take time (and a small catalog of games) to find?
    Sponsors.  The "Auction" exclusive-upfront-fee licenses are rare (or rather the level of risk for a small team to build a game of sufficient scope to gain exclusive interest is hard to justify upfront).  The "Gameshop" style non-exclusive upfront-fee licenses do exist, however the number of active sponsors in the market are few so overall revenue is limited (in comparison to slower but longer revenue-split).  There are links on this forum to such sponsor portals, although it's a changing list with high churn so your own research will be necessary.
    Virality.  As always, it's possible but improbable!  But more contagious these days is the speed and quantity of rip-offs and clones.  Any big-idea must be protected with (or leverage) a server-side strategy.
    Of course everybody's mileage will vary, most will quietly stall whereas a few successes are very real and highly deserved (and often humble!).  I hope that's a fair and helpful overview.
      
  21. Like
    b10b got a reaction from Kevin Trepanier in Questions about HTML5 game market form out-of-the-loop guy   
    You might remember in the old days non-exclusives were sometimes called "site-locks" and it was considered a big-bad when other sites embedded or IFramed the game (effectively leaching)?  Whereas these days (within a revenue-split model) it's often advantageous to allow other sites to link, embed, and further distribute content - assuming it is properly managed with authentic parties.  A good publishing partner will actively negotiate distribution and licensing deals with such channels - in a way not dissimilar to how TV "syndication" works.  And, so long as all parties are recipients of the upside, this is usually a good thing that results in growing royalties.  But I don't want to end up sounding like a sales pitch for anyone and everyone offering revenue-split - not all are worthwhile - explore, ask tough questions of potential partners!
  22. Like
    b10b got a reaction from Kevin Trepanier in Questions about HTML5 game market form out-of-the-loop guy   
    Hi @Kevin Trepanier,
    From a FGL-Flash-era comparison the big changes are HTML5's shift towards revenue-split, syndication, multi-platform, multi-player.  A good Publishing Partner (who can bring high volume traffic and share revenues fairly) is good to have but might take time (and a small catalog of games) to find?
    Sponsors.  The "Auction" exclusive-upfront-fee licenses are rare (or rather the level of risk for a small team to build a game of sufficient scope to gain exclusive interest is hard to justify upfront).  The "Gameshop" style non-exclusive upfront-fee licenses do exist, however the number of active sponsors in the market are few so overall revenue is limited (in comparison to slower but longer revenue-split).  There are links on this forum to such sponsor portals, although it's a changing list with high churn so your own research will be necessary.
    Virality.  As always, it's possible but improbable!  But more contagious these days is the speed and quantity of rip-offs and clones.  Any big-idea must be protected with (or leverage) a server-side strategy.
    Of course everybody's mileage will vary, most will quietly stall whereas a few successes are very real and highly deserved (and often humble!).  I hope that's a fair and helpful overview.
      
  23. Like
    b10b got a reaction from Reborned in Questions about HTML5 game market form out-of-the-loop guy   
    Hi @Kevin Trepanier,
    From a FGL-Flash-era comparison the big changes are HTML5's shift towards revenue-split, syndication, multi-platform, multi-player.  A good Publishing Partner (who can bring high volume traffic and share revenues fairly) is good to have but might take time (and a small catalog of games) to find?
    Sponsors.  The "Auction" exclusive-upfront-fee licenses are rare (or rather the level of risk for a small team to build a game of sufficient scope to gain exclusive interest is hard to justify upfront).  The "Gameshop" style non-exclusive upfront-fee licenses do exist, however the number of active sponsors in the market are few so overall revenue is limited (in comparison to slower but longer revenue-split).  There are links on this forum to such sponsor portals, although it's a changing list with high churn so your own research will be necessary.
    Virality.  As always, it's possible but improbable!  But more contagious these days is the speed and quantity of rip-offs and clones.  Any big-idea must be protected with (or leverage) a server-side strategy.
    Of course everybody's mileage will vary, most will quietly stall whereas a few successes are very real and highly deserved (and often humble!).  I hope that's a fair and helpful overview.
      
  24. Like
    b10b got a reaction from ozdy in Questions about HTML5 game market form out-of-the-loop guy   
    Hi @Kevin Trepanier,
    From a FGL-Flash-era comparison the big changes are HTML5's shift towards revenue-split, syndication, multi-platform, multi-player.  A good Publishing Partner (who can bring high volume traffic and share revenues fairly) is good to have but might take time (and a small catalog of games) to find?
    Sponsors.  The "Auction" exclusive-upfront-fee licenses are rare (or rather the level of risk for a small team to build a game of sufficient scope to gain exclusive interest is hard to justify upfront).  The "Gameshop" style non-exclusive upfront-fee licenses do exist, however the number of active sponsors in the market are few so overall revenue is limited (in comparison to slower but longer revenue-split).  There are links on this forum to such sponsor portals, although it's a changing list with high churn so your own research will be necessary.
    Virality.  As always, it's possible but improbable!  But more contagious these days is the speed and quantity of rip-offs and clones.  Any big-idea must be protected with (or leverage) a server-side strategy.
    Of course everybody's mileage will vary, most will quietly stall whereas a few successes are very real and highly deserved (and often humble!).  I hope that's a fair and helpful overview.
      
  25. Like
    b10b reacted to zoki_y8 in Y8 Destroys Your Games (and websites)   
    Hello,
    My name is Zoki and I represent Y8.com and network. 
    First of all I would like to apologize to all developers and webmasters and forums out there which were not notified about our actions. Since the falling of FGL and TA, it is not easy to be upto date with the public. To answer your questions and worries, we notified as many websites as we could for our actions and all of them have two months or so, transition time which they could use to replace or remove or resolve their end. The decision was taken around September 2018 and since then we were in discussion and noticing all developers we could.
    I must say that your statement of your Mario flash games not workign on other sites, is not completely true as other member verifeid, the game Mario in Jungle also works for me at 4j website. There is a screenshot of it, tho, i can share it if needed...Furthermore I personally have not licensed any copyrighted game, little less to be Mario style, so maybe there is a confusion about the problem you are describing? If you prefer I can gladly update or remove your game(s) on our network.
    Now back on the more important information, which you are all probably interested in hearing it. Why we decide to take such drastic action?
    Well that is not a simple and short story to tell, but let me give it a try. Since 3 years ago or so, we heavily pushed into buying and licensing games from all types, all devs, all genres, everyone. This was almost the same time when FGL market declared "flash is dead" and other publishers were focusing on other markets (steam, mobile, their own standalone portal versions, etc..) During that period of three years of buying games, we have *licensed and supported* developers of more than 2000 games. None of any other competitor website has invested that much, as we had invested in buying games. During those years of investing into developers, our competitors had tons of fun hacking our games, blocking the outlinks of our games, and even taking variants of future names of our hit games. DMCA reports, legal notices and even Google, were not securing our investment and our games, neither the competitors were playing fair games as we had. While we rarely released games with iconic more games button, or animated thumbnails of our other games, www.Y8.com upload form was spammed with games with animated thumbnails, flashy outlink buttons and even rewards outlinks.
    Meaning, as a thanks that we were licensing exclusive games and releasing them with fair branding and minimal outlinks, the respond we got from competitors were cloned games with 5+ outlinks even on one scene! That is crazy thanks, isn't it?
    Additional topic to mention. Since we started investing into games *before* they were released, other websites were playing safe by offering ads revenue share programs. We tried that 2 years ago with our own solution, which unfortunately it didn't worked out due the restriction which Google had with flash games and ads inside flash objects. You might have heard that Chrome banned flash, Mozilla follows it as well, and soon flash will be permannelty avoided to be used. What you don't know, is that the WebGL games licensing period was extremely hard as in the first year there was *no* support from Unity, browsers were eating the ram in the games, and sometimes even the sound was not able to play as it should be. It was a difficult time for WebGL games, but I can personally say that with our focus of directly investing into an experimental technology for web games during the start of WebGL Games, Y8.com become a leader in quality and inovation when it comes to this market for web games.
    While others websites were not even able to purchase the $1500 license of unity software, were were sharing few license with close developers to work on their games.
    While others needed minutes to load a 90mb+ webgl game to their players, Y8.com was already resolving the http and https mess caused by iframing webgls experimental games.
    And normally, as a thanks of our competitors we started getting our games stolen and rehosted on their servers, normally with rebranded links or blocked outlinks. Bonus was also that when our competitors started to "create/clone" webgl games, their webgl games were coming with a fancy bottom banner supporing their awesome website throughout the whole game! Well, bravo!
    Now we will also play safe and soon will publish our Google Ads revenue share program, really soon.
    So, yes, it just a question of time when www.Y8.com will stop its game distribution, due the fact that market is shrinking and the people inside are playing dirty.
     
    Thank you all for reading, and if there is anything i can help/answer you, let me know here or in private.