dev

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  1. Like
    dev got a reaction from HugoLuc in Sprite Animation: How many frames for a sprite animations is too many frames ?   
    I'd say, your limit is two-fold:
    - Artists limit. No artist wants to build 500 frame-animations, unless he's paid by the hour, in which case your budget is your limit.
    - Memory, kind of straightforward. You'll have to keep in mind a few base devices (e.g. Iphone 4, Galaxy S3) and say, I want to support minimally these devices. Do some tests and you probably don't want to exceed 10mb. Also consider download times (on slower, mobile connections), 5mb is a lot (!) if you have a 50kb/s connection on the subway. But good compression goes a long way.
     
    So the 10 frames for up, down, left, right + idle make 50 frames. At your resolution of 200x200 that's almost 8 megabytes, which is normally the memory budget for the entire game on mobile. For desktop, it's much less of a problem, but there's much less of a market there.
     
    Then you'll have a minimum limit. This depends very much on your art-style. A gameboy game could get away with 2-3 frame walking animations, that art-style would still be acceptable today. That's because the art-style consistently asks the brain to fill in the gaps with their imagination. In graphics, less is often more. But if you pre-render 3d models, 2-frames look horrible, you give the brain a super detailed image but then ask it to ignore a lack of frames. So you can't say what a minimum is, some games require just 3 frames for walking, some 20.  So I'd adjust the art-style depending on your memory budget, 10mb on mobile doesn't allow much.
  2. Like
    dev reacted to rich in Game for sale (easy re-sell money for devs, please read)   
    Fair enough However if you don't learn how to pass QA with this game (or even your next one), when are you ever going to do it?
  3. Like
    dev got a reaction from Philipjones866 in anybody wana help with bitcoin html5 games?   
    Very interesting, bitcoin enthusiast myself here and I know of a few other HTML5 devs who are. Definitely want to keep up to date on this but not sure how I would be able to help and if I have any time for it. Drowning in work at the moment.
     
    Been thinking about developing for bitcoin for a while but I don't have much experience in some of the key areas, in particular security, so it's just been a thought so far.
     
    Anyway, what's the general concept you're trying to push towards? You mentioned passing around bitcoins with games, it's a little vague still. Happy to hear any elaboration on this
  4. Like
    dev reacted to enpu in What's your dev environment like?   
    Hardware:
    MacBook Pro Retina
     
    Software:
    Google Chrome
    Sublime Text 3
    Adobe Photoshop
    Adobe Flash
    Adobe Illustrator
    Logic Pro X
    TexturePacker
    bmGlyph
    MediaHuman Audio Converter
    Spine
    SourceTree
    Parallels Desktop
    Flowdock
    MAMP
  5. Like
    dev got a reaction from kay in How much javascript should I know before going into game development with it?   
    None! Get started making games right away You'll learn along the way.
     
    Your first game can be something like High-Low or Tic-Tac-Toe in JS. Once that's working, visualize it using basic canvas functions. I think that's a great basis. Then decide whether you want to continue with an engine like GM: Studio or delve into a JS framework like phaser.
  6. Like
    dev got a reaction from kay in App store deals?   
    It's been happening for quite some time now. There's nothing to say about 'this deal' if you don't attach a price to it. 
     
    But the fact that publishers are interested in licensing for the appstores too means they're getting value there either from monetization or purely for exposure to drive back traffic or create brand awareness. THe fact that publishers get value from appstores means that every HTML5 game that can viably exist on an appstore just had its value increase. That's a great thing.
     
    Of course there are exclusive-only deals. If the price is right, it's a great thing. However, there are a number of developers who're into HTML5 for the long run and it appears that they all fare much better by retaining their IP than selling it off in a one-time deal. I think exclusive deals are great if you're going to do HTML5 for 6-12 months while paying for college. But if you want to develop a viable business, non-exclusive deals, partnerships, revenue sharing, branded games and self-publishing (potentiall on an appstore) is the way to go.
     
    I've seen exclusive Web App + Native App rights go for anything upwards of 4k. In the long-run, that's not a great price. (a solid title can generally make 3k non-exclusives and 3k in rentals/revenueshares in 1 year, and you retain your IP and appstore rights). But in the short-term, getting 4-5k for an exclusive deal is nice, too. It allows you to kickstart your business and if you can make two titles like say every 7 weeks and investing $750 for each game in art and sound assets, you've got a pretty decent monthly salary.
  7. Like
    dev reacted to 1-800-STAR-WARS in Do you agree? How In-app Purchases Has Destroyed The Industry   
    I think IAPs would annoy me less if this current model of using timers and lives would die out. I might want to opt to buy a faster car in a single player game, or buy a powerup in candy crush or whatever. What I hate in the current market is the 'press this, now wait x hours or pay $$$' model. I don't know how anyone finds that fun, it's just frustrating. Pretty much all city building games are the same, there isn't any gameplay, it's just press this button and wait this amount of time! Yet somehow it generates a buttload of money...
  8. Like
    dev reacted to away168 in Dealing with your HTML5 game if it is being hijacked?   
    Thank you guys! your answers and support are most helpful.
     
    I think I'll find some tricks on what Developoid said about the gateway server and also email them about this issue.
  9. Like
    dev got a reaction from mentuat in Dealing with your HTML5 game if it is being hijacked?   
    A few things to note:
     
    - Always have some kind of credits / linkback to your own game. Even if a game gets plays elsewhere, you'll at least benefit from some exposure driving traffic back to you. This also helps give you the credibility you are the original creator of the work when you request it to be removed from platforms.
     
    - Consider running a very simple server that responds to very simple get requests. e.g. a http request to the url yourserver.com/?game=game_id will return the latest version of your game. Run this request ingame, and if it's different from the one you're hosting on your own website, quit the game and simply show a button linking back to your own website or partners. You don't actually have to change the game at all, but you can simply change the ID number monthly and reupload, should take 3 minutes per game. It's a small effort on your part that can be circumvented by a slightly bigger, yet still smallish effort on the pirates' part, but generally all they do is run a script, download all your files, find a suitable icon-image and package these things in bulk. If the game doesn't work, it's unlikely they'll go through the effort of trying to hack it somehow. So even small deterrents really help with small games that are auto-pirated in bulk, especially by people clueless about anything other than downloading, packaging and uploading other peoples' work.
     
    - Mail the content provider/host. Very often pirates will host or market a game through entirely legitimate sales channels who have a policy of complying with IP-infringement complaints because their business can't legitimately exist if it doesn't honor such requests. While some of such hosts won't go out of their way to fight piracy on their platform, they will generally honour requests to at least keep up the appearance of being anti-piracy. This generally works much better than contacting the pirate himself. Which is the next thing you should do.
     
    - Ignore it. If you look closely, the pirate has less than 400 downloads on 10 games. 40 downloads per game on average. (for your game probably a bit less, e.g. he also pirated Zombies Can't Jump which is probably a big chunk of those 400 downloads!) You're *not* missing out on any revenue. Those 40 downloads are probably worth about 50 dollar cents. If you have a job that pays $15 an hour, spending more than two minutes on this means you have a more profitable opportunity cost haha. For smaller game titles, piracy generally has no effect on your sales, not to the extent that going out of your way to prevent it is worthwhile.
  10. Like
    dev reacted to Biggerplay in Has anyone heard of the WordPress Arcade Plugin?   
    @Developoid
     
    I think that's pretty much it, it looks like it's something which is very easy to do because it's fairly easy to set up, but because of that lots of people have done it, leading to a saturation in the market, which then means it's all about marketing/SEO etc which is not easy.
     
    Having said that, I would of thought game developers have an advantage because we can make our own content.
  11. Like
    dev got a reaction from Biggerplay in Has anyone heard of the WordPress Arcade Plugin?   
    Hehe, because everyone thinks they can still make money out of it. I mean at the end of the day you can set up a site like this with the best arcade package, hosting for a year and a custom theme for under $300. It's a small investment for your own portal with hundreds to thousands of games. If you can market it well, curate the games well, write some unique descriptions for some of the popular games, build a viral campaign, build links, integrate social stuff and drive traffic, you're essentially able to make money in your sleep. 
     
    Some are quite succesful. Plicatibu for example mentioned he has well over 50 thousand unique visitors per month. If a unique visitor plays 8 game sessions and looks at 10 refreshed pages in a month, that's 500k pages served, with 2 ads on a page that's a million ads. With an eCPM of say $1 that's a thousand dollars a month in income. A great place to start investing in more marketing, new websites, better content etc.
     
    The problem is, all that really is very difficult. It's definitely not as popular to do as it used to be and I see a lot of people make very little money and then end up selling their site for $50 or $200. It takes a long time to build up the right numbers and unique content. I'd rather stick with building games, but it's definitely an interesting career
  12. Like
    dev reacted to OzRamos in What's your dev environment like?   
    I'm curious to know what your complete dev environment is like. I have a weird obsession with development speed and am always trying to figure out new ways to code faster. At this point, I can almost code faster than I can talk
     
    Here's my physical setup at work (which is similar to what I have at home):

     
    I use two monitors, one dedicated to my editor which is further broken down into multiple views, one for photoshop/illustrator, and then I have a Galaxy Note that streams live video from my desktop to runs a web browser.
     
    The last bit lets me install livereload, so anytime I save in my editor the tablet automatically refreshes without me having to Alt-Tab, refresh, Alt-Tab.
     
    At work I'm on Windows and at home I'm on Mac, but my actual environment is basically the same:
     
    Code Editor - Sublime Text, loaded with:
    - Advance New File: Let's me use a keychord to create/load a file and supports tabbing, so can create directories too.
    - Emmet: Let's me do insane HMTL expansions, like ul.slideshow>li.slide*3>a+div.content would expand into a <ul> element with three <li>, each containing a link and a div that I can then tab through to add content! lol
    - Origami - Let's me create all sorts of crazy views and move tabs between them
    - PlainTasks - Creates todo lists that let you check off items, right inside the editor
    - Sidebar Enhancements - Just makes the sidebar MUCH more useable
     
    LiveReload with chrome extension (PrePros for windows)
    - Automatically compiles SASS, CoffeeScript, minifies JavaScript and CSS, gives you a back massage, and reloads browser when you save. Instantly and without Alt-Tabbing. And if you have a dual monitor setup, you never have to leave your code editor.
     
    TextExpander (PhraseExpress for windows)
    Let's you expand short characters/keychords into text you can tab through, macros, and a bunch of other magic. This is my number one time saver. I use a lot of Lorem Ipsum at work, so I have lorem automatically expand into a 5 paragraph block of dummy text.
     
    Tower (GitHub client for Windows)
    - My favorite GUI's for revision controlling
  13. Like
    dev got a reaction from stevefromio in Has anyone heard of the WordPress Arcade Plugin?   
    It's legal. There's actually a lot of websites and scripts like that, a culmination of a decade of flash technology creating a huge marketplace for publishers, developers, advertisers and facilitators. 
     
    Generally you don't have to worry. Close to 100% of these portals are completely flash-based and will completely fail to work on mobile devices which is where we're seeing increasingly larger traffic (not just in absolute numbers but also as a share of all traffic), particularly in western countries where a visitor is deemed to have value in terms of advertising. (most portal owners will value a visitor from most Asian countries at $0 for example, very few understand the market potential here and can grab it). 
     
    Furthermore, the number of portals are in the tens of thousands, no joke, each with a few hundred or more commonly a few thousand flash games. None of these games have unique descriptions even, they're all the same, and thus have a very hard time competing for organic traffic in search rankings. (and if you don't have organic traffic, you fail, there's generally no money in advertising a website where you advertise yourself simply due to basic algebra. If you pay and receive the same amount for an average visitor minus e.g. Google's cut and the CTR, you lose money). 
     
    So most of these websites make very little money and they're usually pumped out like crazy. You can buy your own portal with 2000 games for a few hundred dollars, but search engines are extremely biased against duplicate content, they've gotten smart. So it's very hard to get 10k thousand visitors a month which will generate a little less than $10 usually, not enough to pay for your domain+hosting, let alone recouperate your investment or make any profit.
     
    As for why Spil, well they get paid for the premium packages, and there's ad-integration as well as generating brand awareness and free exposure. I think it's a clear sign though that Spil is investing 5million into HTML5 though. But it's important as developers to be vigilant about contracts which allow Spil to integrate our HTML5 games into such portals in the future. Getting paid a one time $350 amount like I've seen some here accept from Spil for them to be allowed to include the game in a script-package that's used by 50k wordpress sites is ridiculous. Spil has noted that it will be adding HTML5 games to these packages, so make sure to check your contracts before signing them and set the price accordingly.
  14. Like
    dev got a reaction from Protopop in [WIP] Nimian Legends - Bite-size HTML5 RPG   
    Awesome and inspiring! 
  15. Like
    dev reacted to mentuat in paypal refund issues   
    it's probably not a fun conversation you'll want to have with the sponsor - but if they overpaid you because of a mistake at their end then they should accept that they're going to get a lesser amount back due to the conversion and fees involved with the transfer
  16. Like
    dev reacted to Protopop in [WIP] Nimian Legends - Bite-size HTML5 RPG   
    Cool Benny -thanks! I can tell you know your stuff and it’s heartening to get a compliment like that.

    Many of the icons and photos are stock art, along with stock music. There’s a lot of plugins i could never do this without - like leaflet and jquery. The rest is me (javascript, the map, character + game design etc).

    The game itself is free. the first goal is the dungeon master in me just wanting to bring the world in my head to life:) I wanted to make it accessible without any barriers or forced signups, so i went with HTML so it can be shared on as many platforms as possible. The login is handled by Parse, i just didn't enable it yet because im trying to figure out how to handle remote vs local save integration. And the gold in game is free too - well, you do have to kill beasts, find treasure and complete quests to earn it:)

    Commercially I hope it will publicize my Nimian Battles 3d open world mobile games im working on that are set in the world. It’s all part of the same universe and i hope that sales from my 3d game apps will let me continue to bring the world to life, and eventually work with more people to make it even better.

    Whew! anyways thanks for asking, i think i had to get that all out of me;)
  17. Like
    dev got a reaction from AhmedElyamani in How much javascript should I know before going into game development with it?   
    None! Get started making games right away You'll learn along the way.
     
    Your first game can be something like High-Low or Tic-Tac-Toe in JS. Once that's working, visualize it using basic canvas functions. I think that's a great basis. Then decide whether you want to continue with an engine like GM: Studio or delve into a JS framework like phaser.
  18. Like
    dev got a reaction from albania-2014 in How much javascript should I know before going into game development with it?   
    None! Get started making games right away You'll learn along the way.
     
    Your first game can be something like High-Low or Tic-Tac-Toe in JS. Once that's working, visualize it using basic canvas functions. I think that's a great basis. Then decide whether you want to continue with an engine like GM: Studio or delve into a JS framework like phaser.
  19. Like
    dev reacted to rich in My Income Report for January - Over $45,743 this month alone   
    Ok I this joke has run its course now. I'm not going to delete it because it was pretty amusing in places but I am going to lock it.
  20. Like
    dev reacted to austin in Clay.io is under attack...   
    Woke up to a nightmare. Problem resolved. Looking into why it happened and how to make sure it never happens again. Sorry everyone!
  21. Like
    dev got a reaction from scoots in 7 reasons why appstores are doomed   
    Interesting and very true on a number of points but pretty one-sided (which is okay, sometimes).
     
    For the other side, my comments below:
     
    1° the download / access flow is just bad:
    Yes, via an email, sure. But can you remember the last time you obtained an app solely through an email? I've never been emailed an app link. Appstores are great for the user because there's one single place to get all your content specifically made for your device. The general internet (or e.g.) email just doesn't offer that level of filtering. Steam or an Apple Appstore are succesful because they actually hugely improved the download/access flow. Comparing it to a web-app is fair, but then we've already got web-app stores, so the comparison isn't fair. It's just another native vs web discussion that's not really just about app stores, it blurs the discussion sadly.
     
    2° updates are a pain in the ass
    Absolutely not for the user. Yes, for a developer updating can be a pain and I fully agree, I don't have anything to add here. But for a user? Apps are curated, tested for security and in part stability. Updates are given more weight and thus more attention. What's more, *I* can choose whether I update or not, the user has choice, the developer can't force the user by changing the web-app (potential security problem, too). And updates are only installed once, whereas web-apps need to be downloaded over and over again. Especially for mobile devices on mobile internet connections (3g in a building / subway / at my friends' room that somehow acts like an internet-free cave?) having to download content on every playthrough is a pain and requires a proper backend for any developer that builds a popular web-game on any scale, something appstores handle for you. There's huge benefits for both users and developers in this space, too.
     
    3° discovery is terrible
    100% moot argument because app-store discovery is not mutually exclusive to anything else. So, appstores are an extra way to discover apps, not the only exclusive way. Look at a popular game like Kingdom Rush and you'll find *huge* amounts of appstore installs being generated through traffic from their Flash versions or Webapp versions. But all these stores point to the appstore version in the end for the premium content, which is where the developers want users to go. I wonder why? Discovery is not perfect, but any developer (as many have) can drive discovery outside the appstore to the appstore.
     
    4° 30% transaction fees are a steal
    This I think is a valid point for the future. But at the moment we're still seeing developers who built a web and native version of their game send all their users to the native version. It's probably because of one thing. Appstores have *much* better payment ecosystems. Something that a lot of people don't understand is this. Apple has more than half a billion creditcards on file. That's absolutely insane and it's a big reason its generated so much revenue from content. As a developer you can very easily tap into that, a user only has to write their own password once. The bounce rate on payments on webapps is much higher because a user has to go through all kinds of hoops to make the payment. That's why a 30% margin is fine because 70% of something is better than 100% of barely anything. This will likely change in the future as mobile web services (e.g. for payments) will mature, but at the moment there's no comparison. Try to get someone to pay upfront for a Flash or HTML5 game, or for in-game content, it just barely happens compared to the native version. This will change, but not next week.
     
    5° native doesn’t equal quality.
    Don't think this argument holds much weight. I'd say the average quality of webapps is not as good as native apps, for one. You can look at an app, see screenshots, reviews, and seeing it in the first place usually means it was featured/trending. Webapps don't have a repository for apps that is mature the curation, metadata, screenshots, reviews etc of a native store. Not even close.
     
    6° most apps need the web anyway
    What? Ridiculous argument. Because an application users the internet, it's inherently a good idea to build it in an internet browser? No. 
     
    7° why would you wrap your app in a web viewer?
    Yeah, why would you? Ugh. I think a better question at this point is why do I bother with someone throwing nonsense reasons around who obviously has vested interests in web apps because he has a company that allows you to build webapps.
     
    Anyway there's a lot of reasons why appstores are annoying and what the future of customer-software on desktop/mobile devices will be. It's very interesting and I'm personally a big fan of web applications. But let's be serious about this discussion.
  22. Like
    dev got a reaction from tackle in 7 reasons why appstores are doomed   
    Interesting and very true on a number of points but pretty one-sided (which is okay, sometimes).
     
    For the other side, my comments below:
     
    1° the download / access flow is just bad:
    Yes, via an email, sure. But can you remember the last time you obtained an app solely through an email? I've never been emailed an app link. Appstores are great for the user because there's one single place to get all your content specifically made for your device. The general internet (or e.g.) email just doesn't offer that level of filtering. Steam or an Apple Appstore are succesful because they actually hugely improved the download/access flow. Comparing it to a web-app is fair, but then we've already got web-app stores, so the comparison isn't fair. It's just another native vs web discussion that's not really just about app stores, it blurs the discussion sadly.
     
    2° updates are a pain in the ass
    Absolutely not for the user. Yes, for a developer updating can be a pain and I fully agree, I don't have anything to add here. But for a user? Apps are curated, tested for security and in part stability. Updates are given more weight and thus more attention. What's more, *I* can choose whether I update or not, the user has choice, the developer can't force the user by changing the web-app (potential security problem, too). And updates are only installed once, whereas web-apps need to be downloaded over and over again. Especially for mobile devices on mobile internet connections (3g in a building / subway / at my friends' room that somehow acts like an internet-free cave?) having to download content on every playthrough is a pain and requires a proper backend for any developer that builds a popular web-game on any scale, something appstores handle for you. There's huge benefits for both users and developers in this space, too.
     
    3° discovery is terrible
    100% moot argument because app-store discovery is not mutually exclusive to anything else. So, appstores are an extra way to discover apps, not the only exclusive way. Look at a popular game like Kingdom Rush and you'll find *huge* amounts of appstore installs being generated through traffic from their Flash versions or Webapp versions. But all these stores point to the appstore version in the end for the premium content, which is where the developers want users to go. I wonder why? Discovery is not perfect, but any developer (as many have) can drive discovery outside the appstore to the appstore.
     
    4° 30% transaction fees are a steal
    This I think is a valid point for the future. But at the moment we're still seeing developers who built a web and native version of their game send all their users to the native version. It's probably because of one thing. Appstores have *much* better payment ecosystems. Something that a lot of people don't understand is this. Apple has more than half a billion creditcards on file. That's absolutely insane and it's a big reason its generated so much revenue from content. As a developer you can very easily tap into that, a user only has to write their own password once. The bounce rate on payments on webapps is much higher because a user has to go through all kinds of hoops to make the payment. That's why a 30% margin is fine because 70% of something is better than 100% of barely anything. This will likely change in the future as mobile web services (e.g. for payments) will mature, but at the moment there's no comparison. Try to get someone to pay upfront for a Flash or HTML5 game, or for in-game content, it just barely happens compared to the native version. This will change, but not next week.
     
    5° native doesn’t equal quality.
    Don't think this argument holds much weight. I'd say the average quality of webapps is not as good as native apps, for one. You can look at an app, see screenshots, reviews, and seeing it in the first place usually means it was featured/trending. Webapps don't have a repository for apps that is mature the curation, metadata, screenshots, reviews etc of a native store. Not even close.
     
    6° most apps need the web anyway
    What? Ridiculous argument. Because an application users the internet, it's inherently a good idea to build it in an internet browser? No. 
     
    7° why would you wrap your app in a web viewer?
    Yeah, why would you? Ugh. I think a better question at this point is why do I bother with someone throwing nonsense reasons around who obviously has vested interests in web apps because he has a company that allows you to build webapps.
     
    Anyway there's a lot of reasons why appstores are annoying and what the future of customer-software on desktop/mobile devices will be. It's very interesting and I'm personally a big fan of web applications. But let's be serious about this discussion.
  23. Like
    dev reacted to scoots in Downgrading iOS versions   
    Sorry, I need to give a clarification here as I was mistaken on exactly what is possible. 
     
    If you have an iOS dev account and have a device you have managed iOS versions of using iTunes and XCode, you can reset the iOS device os to an older version of the OS only if you haven't upgraded it to iOS7. If you have a new iOS 7 device or an old device you've upgraded to 7, you have to jailbreak. The way they currently manage iOS versions at my work is by not upgrading past the point of no return.
     
    So, for new devices or older ones that have already been upgraded to new iOS, it looks like you might have a tough time doing it. Sorry for the confusing answer, last time I did it was a while back before Apple took away this capability.
  24. Like
    dev reacted to scoots in Downgrading iOS versions   
    Yes, I have done it, though it has been over a year. The guys at my work do it all the time and confirmed it is still possible, and pretty simple
  25. Like
    dev got a reaction from Mefteg in HTML5 RPG Game, does it work?   
    First of all, regardless of what sells or not, start small. First-time large projects have a (making this up but I'm probably close haha) 99.99% failure rate. Also, taking on too much too soon is also not conducive to learning the best either. So start small!
     
    The RPG genre typically involves very large games because the point is role playing which requires immersion into some game world. To create such immersion you typically need lots of content to interact with, storylines, items, lots of environments, lots of characters etc.  So I'd suggest beginning with some smaller casual puzzle games. 
     
    As for what publishers want. There is very little interest for desktop HTML5 games. They're not easy to monetize and there is huge competition from both flash as well as regular PC/Mac games outside the browser (e.g. Steam). Publishers interested in HTML5 are interested in mobile games because mobile-advertising is hot, one can circumvent the appstores and mobile traffic is growing rapidly (in some markets exponentially so). Generally mobile means you've got to work with screens between 4 and 10 inches in size and both phones and tablets are kind of converging a bit to a 7 inch average or so. That's generally better suited for puzzle games than content-rich games like RPGs. But it really depends. I played some of the most awesome RPG games on my tiny gameboy screen and was completely immersed in these worlds as a kid. Things like FinalFantasy/Pokemon style turn-based combat should be very well suited to these small devices. 
     
    Saving the game state isn't a real issue. You should be able to pretty easily integrate a saving system that connects with a server. It's not super easy, but it'd be the least of my worries. Memory and sounds is probably a lot more difficult. I generally try to stay under 10mb of texture memory, you can go quite far beyond that with some tricks, but it's not straightforward. Still, a well optimized RPG doesn't have to use much memory, again just look at all the gameboy classics.
     
    What's interesting about HTML5 is that it's cross-platform. If you're happy with it but feel restricted by the browser, you can wrap the games as native apps for any mobile device. Especially on tablets, a proper RPG would be cool, although the appstores are known for pretty extreme saturation and while monetization options are plenty, marketing your app is pretty tricky because once you send the player to the appstore, there's not much you can do, there's very little control or communication with the player at the point of sale.
     
    Anyway, welcome to the community and good luck with your first game! I suggest to start small with a casual puzzle title and build the RPG in your spare time for fun!