Milton

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  1. Like
    Milton got a reaction from miguelito in sample images   
    Phaser examples, although "Please note that this license does not cover the graphics or audio files that you will find located in this repository. None of them are to be used in commercial games."...
    Open Game Art
    GameArtGuppy
  2. Like
    Milton got a reaction from samme in Low fps... is my game so advanced?   
    This means you are doing something wrong. Increasing a pool should not slow anything down, only eat some memory.
    Maybe you're not returning your objects back to the pool. Put your game online somewhere so we can have a look.
  3. Like
    Milton got a reaction from samme in Low fps... is my game so advanced?   
    Usually when games are slow with many objects, the pool is too small. Try it with no pool, i.e. create a new object every time you need it
    The amount of objects itself is not very relevant (as long as they don't all have different textures). 10000 objects with the same texture will pretty much render just as fast as 1 object... 
  4. Like
    Milton got a reaction from scheffgames in Music you listen while working.   
    A classical music station. It is claimed Bach improves IQ
  5. Like
    Milton got a reaction from scheffgames in Music you listen while working.   
    A classical music station. It is claimed Bach improves IQ
  6. Like
    Milton got a reaction from samid737 in Calculate world x/y of offset child sprite while parent is rotated   
    http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/156833/how-to-find-a-point-after-rotation
    Phaser.Point.rotate does this for you I think.
  7. Like
    Milton got a reaction from samid737 in Calculate world x/y of offset child sprite while parent is rotated   
    http://math.stackexchange.com/questions/156833/how-to-find-a-point-after-rotation
    Phaser.Point.rotate does this for you I think.
  8. Like
    Milton got a reaction from scheffgames in Approach for a tennis game?   
    http://codeincomplete.com/posts/javascript-racer/ ?
    http://www.extentofthejam.com/pseudo/
  9. Like
    Milton got a reaction from Kitanga Nday (NDAY Games) in Can someone even hope to make money with HTML5 games without supporting mobile?   
    But why would you export to some HTML5 format instead of native? Most mobile games go native (and thus use Unity).
  10. Like
    Milton got a reaction from Kitanga Nday (NDAY Games) in Can someone even hope to make money with HTML5 games without supporting mobile?   
    I'm interested to know what Unity can't do? (that GameMaker can)
  11. Like
    Milton reacted to samme in draw transparency to graphics object   
     
  12. Like
    Milton reacted to totallybueno in Problems with IE (paid work/help)   
     
    Thanks @Milton, not crashing now!
     
     
    (I want to delete this picture but I can´t, no worries about this :D)

  13. Like
    Milton got a reaction from totallybueno in Problems with IE (paid work/help)   
    Haven't got time now, I'll have a look later. Got it running on localhost, and indeed runs fine on FF/Chrome, not on IE...
  14. Like
    Milton got a reaction from Kyros2000GameDev in How can i calculate projectile like arrow on isometric?   
    Hi GBear.
    I created quick and dirty Isometric and 3/4 versions (very basic, not optimized).
    Source Iso / 3/4.
    Of course I used a ball  so I didn't have to animate an Arrow sprite. But that's a matter of checking the inclination, and using the corresponding sprite/rotation.
    Interesting thing is that the only difference between the two is not using X in the 3/4 projection:
    Iso:
    public static function isoTo2D(pt:Point):Point{ var tempPt:Point = new Point(0, 0); tempPt.x = (2 * pt.y + pt.x) / 2; tempPt.y = (2 * pt.y - pt.x) / 2; return(tempPt); } public static function twoDToIso(x:Float, y:Float, z:Float):Point{ var tempPt:Point = new Point(0,0); tempPt.x = x - y; tempPt.y = ((x + y) / 2) - z; return(tempPt); } 3/4:
    public static function isoTo2D(pt:Point):Point{ var tempPt:Point = new Point(0, 0); tempPt.x = pt.x; tempPt.y = 2 * pt.y; return(tempPt); } public static function twoDToIso(x:Float, y:Float, z:Float):Point{ var tempPt:Point = new Point(0,0); tempPt.x = x; tempPt.y = (y / 2) - z; return(tempPt); }  
    Hope this helps.
  15. Like
    Milton got a reaction from mattstyles in A HTML5 Beginner, Guide Me Please   
     
    http://www.wrox.com/WileyCDA/WroxTitle/MCSD-Certification-Toolkit-Exam-70-483-Programming-in-C-.productCd-1118612094.html
    I think you should be able to do this in about 6 months. That may seem a lot, but don't rush the exam.
    You'll have actually learned programming then, and Javascript will make a lot more sense too.
  16. Like
    Milton got a reaction from scheffgames in A HTML5 Beginner, Guide Me Please   
    I think it is wrong to start learning with a dynamic, untyped language like Javascript. Python at least is typed.
    I started with assembly, then C, then C++, and only then came the fun languages like Perl, Ruby, Python, JS, etc.
    The problem with 'dynamic untyped' is that you don't understand/learn what's going on. You don't understand memory, pointers, references, garbage collection etc.
    If you want to get a programming job, either go the hard route and get a certification, or learn something that not a lot of people know (well). The average Perl job pays twice what a Java/C# one does. And is easier and more fun... Or maybe XSLT. Quite easy, and a lot of demand.
  17. Like
    Milton got a reaction from hayesmaker in Thrust 30   
    Wow. Excellent. I don't often comment on games, but this just oozes style. Reminds me a bit of Fort Apocalypse for the C64. Yes, I am that old
  18. Like
    Milton got a reaction from obiot in HTML5 isometric engine?   
    That's why I recommended MelonJs  I think you can create a nice Isometric game with Melon, although, it's not much more difficult with Phaser. There is a lot of demand for Isometric, you should make it as easy as possible
  19. Like
    Milton got a reaction from obiot in HTML5 isometric engine?   
    That's why I recommended MelonJs  I think you can create a nice Isometric game with Melon, although, it's not much more difficult with Phaser. There is a lot of demand for Isometric, you should make it as easy as possible
  20. Like
    Milton got a reaction from The_dude8080 in [Phaser] Build-A-Bear Adventures   
    You can check out the source  Not even obfuscated.
    They just use cleverly layered prerendered over/under images (that happen to have an Isometric perspective). Nothing is calculated runtime.
  21. Like
    Milton got a reaction from The_dude8080 in HTML5 isometric engine?   
    Melon.js seems very nice. Didn't know about that one. Isometric Tiled support, convex shape collision, yep, definitely recommended.
    The Phaser plugin only does AABB, but you could use any existing physics library, it just wouldn't be integrated into the Phaser physics calls (for this test I used Bullet (ammo.js)).
    About Diablo being grid-fixed, I would think so. Why do you doubt that?
  22. Like
    Milton got a reaction from mattstyles in var vs. this   
    Not a good idea to scare a newbie with these kind of answers  (or me for that matter).
  23. Like
    Milton reacted to mattstyles in var vs. this   
    Don't worry about `let` and `const` instead of `var`, you're not there yet.
    Check out resources regarding scoping in JS, as Milton says, it can get tricky but its critical you get a handle on it and there are many many good resources out there. Use MDN to get started.
    Very very briefly, `this` refers to the scope of a function, nothing more. Sounds simple right? Unfortunately (or, fortunately in many cases), JS is dynamic and the scope is very easy to change, which is what makes it tricky. Take the following 'simple' code:
    function myLogger (event) { console.log(this) } // What is the scope here? myLogger() // How about when this gets called? document.body.addEventListener('click', myLogger) // How about now? var obj = { value: 1, log: myLogger } obj.log() Understanding what each one of those calls logs is critical to understanding how scoping works in JS. Make sure you grasp how scope gets mutated in these cases and why that is useful. Note that you need no understanding of object-oriented programming for this, it becomes related but the rules are removed from it. JS is object-oriented (in so much as objects are first-class citizens) but it is prototypal and not classical (ignore the confusing ES2015 class syntax, they aren't real classical classes) so there are some alarming differences if you come from a truly classical OOP language (C, Java etc).
    Once you have a handle on the scope of the function from the above code example check out .bind, .apply and .call (again, MDN is your best place to start) and how these built-in functions help you to manage scope. If you're wanting to write in a C/Java-style with pseudo-classes (JS has no proper classes) then you'll need them.
    Once you've learnt all this you'll be in a position to completely throw them away if you want, functions are also first-class citizens in JS and it makes a decent stab at being a functional language. It is perfectly viable and attractive to never write `this` into your programs, but only once you've learnt how it works and why it is good/bad will you be in a decision to decide how you want to write stuff.
  24. Like
    Milton got a reaction from samme in Let's talk about sprite batches   
    I'm not up to date on Phaser (ping @rich), but a Spritebatch will only position, scale, and rotate. Tinting, masking, etc won't work. A Group is a different thing altogether. It's more of a logical structure, that happens to extend a DisplayObjectContainer (will be optimized/batched also, just not as much as a Spritebatch). I would say, only use Spritebatch when you have a lot (1000+) of 'unGrouped/unNested' Sprites with which you're not doing anything advanced.
  25. Like
    Milton got a reaction from feudalwars in Let's talk about sprite batches   
    from Pixi:
    The ParticleContainer class is a really fast version of the Container built solely for speed,
    so use when you need a lot of sprites or particles. The tradeoff of the ParticleContainer is that advanced
    functionality will not work. ParticleContainer implements only the basic object transform (position, scale, rotation).
    Any other functionality like tinting, masking, etc will not work on sprites in this batch.
    https://github.com/pixijs/pixi.js/issues/1039:
    Regular displayObjectContainers also batch automatically. For most uses case they are the best choice as they offer speed and flexibility. Having a SpriteBatch class implies that a displayObjectContainer does not do any batching and is magically going to be faster.
    The reason a spriteBatch class is sometimes faster is that it uploads transforms to be calculated on the GPU. The canvas spriteBatcher also optimizes the draw calls by not using the translate() function if there is no rotation on a sprite.
    Its performance gains will only be apparent if there are no nested children in the sprites added. A perfect use case for it would be particles and also a tilemap
    It definitely has its place but the title SpriteBatch is really misleading. Really it should be called something like GPUTransformContainer - but thats a terrible name :/
    Definitely worth noting again that 99% of the time a regular displayObjectContainer will be the most efficient way to render content.