mazoku

Current state of the market

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11 hours ago, sk1e said:

But on the other hand, there will always be demand for good games

Considering the time and energy needed to produce a game,  devs probably should be more specific in their business plans :)

EDIT: I'm specializing in bad games. It's an almost untapped niche. The demand is there, but not many people can produce a properly bad game. Most are spewing average stuff that begs to remain ignored.

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1 hour ago, blossy said:

devs probably should be more specific in their business plans

Agree, but when you dont have any resources beside your skills and time, it is rather hard to make a proper and specific business plan with  game market is so overcrowded and main problem is not to make a game, but to make your game be noticed. You can spend half a year making game for Steam and make zero sales, but if you can make a game per month, then you get feedback from the market faster and you learn faster, and you can find your niche faster. At least that what we where thinking :D May be im wrong tho, dont have big sales to back this theory so far

 

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On 8.02.2018 at 1:13 PM, blossy said:

I'm not sure why developers continue to spend their efforts with these goals/markets in mind.

When you start your adventure as a game developer these are just the easiest and the most reliable ways of making any money out of your games. In these models of business you don't have to care about all these other things that have to be made if you want to earn money (hosting, monetization system, testing, marketing and so on). They create plenty of additional problems you need to solve on your own. When you're a newbie in games development business it all can easily overwhelm you. It's why most of them choose sponsor/publisher/client route at the beginning and just focus on only creating games. As time goes by and they gain experience, they start to think how could they make money on their games without any intermediaries between them and players. I think it's a quite natural process and if you looked around a little bit more in this forum, you could find topics where developers write about their far from ideal experiences with sponsors/publishers/clients and their plans of making money on their own way. So it's not that all developers (and maybe even not most) make (or try to make) business in one of these 4 mentioned options. These options are just probably the most popular on this forum.


If you would like to change it, you should finish your project, make it a financial success and share your story with specific figures. Then for sure many developers would like to follow your path and if they repeated your success, your business model would become another popular way of making money out of games and you would become another HTML5 games star B) Wish you luck and I hope some day we'll be given opportunity to read your story kind of "How I made $1,000,000 on my bad game" :) 

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53 minutes ago, bambo said:

When you start your adventure as a game developer these are just the easiest and the most reliable ways of making any money out of your game....

If you would like to change it, you should finish your project, make it a financial success and share your story with specific figures. Then for sure many developers would like to follow your path and if they repeated your success, your business model would become another popular way of making money out of games and you would become another HTML5 games star B) Wish you luck and I hope some day we'll be given opportunity to read your story kind of "How I made $1,000,000 on my bad game" :) 

2

All you've written makes a lot of sense, but I am skeptic about certain points...

1. The first games of a new game developer aren't very likely to catch a publisher's attention. In HTML5's early days - maybe, but now? I see only polished products in any of the big publishers' catalogs. Yes, most of them look like cookie-cutter clones of popular mobile titles so they would be easy to reproduce (in some basic form) for a newbie. But the lack of polish (usually) is the thing that distinguishes a newbie dev's release.

2. Making games for publishers doesn't look fun. You're most likely sacrificing your uniqueness and the fun factor of making games. You may get bored prematurely - before the 'polish' phase, and a bored hobbyist dev may decide to give up. 

3. I actually like  @sk1e's approach - make whatever you want to work on, throw it out there and observe the reactions.

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Making games as a hobby is much more fun and liberating than doing that commercially. Commercial gamedev is one of those disciplines that doesn't pay well and will eat your soul alive.

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1 hour ago, Red Spark said:

Making games as a hobby is much more fun and liberating than doing that commercially. Commercial gamedev is one of those disciplines that doesn't pay well and will eat your soul alive.

+1. Commercial also can force you to make choices you wouldn't have necessarily made, and can be stressful when it doesn't go to plan.

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On 10.02.2018 at 4:51 PM, blossy said:

3. I actually like  @sk1e's approach - make whatever you want to work on, throw it out there and observe the reactions.

If I understand you correctly, you want to make original good „bad” game that will fit a niche audience needs? Then release it on popular games publishing platforms (it's how I understand „throw it out there”) and hope it'll get people attention?

Seems it might work for a niche game. :) But even if you'll make it and encourage others by telling your success story, there still be many who choose one of 4 options. They just prefer to make popular games rather than niche ones or they just don't really feel niche needs/aesthetic – and maybe it's one of reasons why there aren't more good „bad” games, even if some try to make it.

I don't want to judge these options and say that any of them is completely senseless. I think they all have their advantages and developers can choose between them, depending on what they currently feel like doing or have just done :)

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13 hours ago, bambo said:

If I understand you correctly, you want to make original good „bad” game that will fit a niche audience needs? Then release it on popular games publishing platforms (it's how I understand „throw it out there”) and hope it'll get people attention?

...

 

I don't make good games simply because I don't have the skills, the experience, the patience, and in some cases - the budget. I aim to make fun, or just hilariously bad games that scratch common itches in a unique way.

I don't aim at niche audiences. And I actually do more research than development these days :( 

On topic: I don't think sticking to popular mobile genres is the best strategy for web games. But I also don't have the experience to back this up, so yes - it seems everybody should rely on their own brain and gut feeling on this...

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I'm maybe late to the party...

I created a game called Theraxius (WIP). It's a simple game to play, but from a technical point of view it's a little more advanced. I can't just pack it and send it to a publisher or upload it on any page, so I have my own page and that leads to another problem: how to get players? I tried almost everything, but without success. I wanted to create a "PC version of HTML5" game - and this market IS dead. Maybe I'm wrong, but I couldn't find any decent game. Today all PC games are on Steam. But I believe that is a different story in HTML5 games that run on every device (PC, smartphones, tables).

So what should I do? Port game to C++ and upload it on Steam or continue with HTML5 and hope that some day eventually will become popular.

I'm amazed how @True Valhalla gets those numbers, I would be happy with less than 1% of that to start.

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Well lets be honest... game development has always been a competitve market. We are passed the days where flash games were insanely popular. HTML5 Game development is a niche market that is not dead by any means. Has it declined in the last decades? Probably, but that does not mean it is dead. Games just keep getting more and more complex, and genre saturation has made players feel "oh this game is like x". In otherwords, players have already played basically all genres of games. Developers need to create games with a certain twist or catalyst in order to market their product.

I'll admit it was "easier" a decade ago, but the market is always open to new developers with new ideas. Take .io games for example. A relatively new genre of online games that encompasses HTML5 with a solid backend for the Multiplayer aspect. Games like Agar.io, Moomoo.io, Diep.io are whats grabbing the attention. Maybe HTML5 game developers need to pivot more.

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On 2/22/2019 at 8:09 PM, therax1986 said:

I wanted to create a "PC version of HTML5" game - and this market IS dead

I'm not sure what you mean here, Steam is thriving, and Steam doesn't care what language your game is written in. I'd assume you mean package your 'web-app game' into something like Electron and release that as a game, at which point, it's just a 'game' that runs on a users' computer, and Steam doesn't care, there are already a couple of Electron (i.e. JS powered) games on Steam.

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