ChrisP

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About ChrisP

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    United Kingdom

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    chrisplongridge
  1. ChrisP

    Rooftop Run

    Ha ha, thanks! Glad you liked it - the designer of the backgrounds is particularly delighted you liked the witch! The dog is called Rocky, and he is constantly getting his owner in to trouble anyway
  2. ChrisP

    Rooftop Run

    A small 'spacebar' or basic platform game which forms part of a Christmas Marketing campaign. Really simple, just hit space or tap your screen. http://www.workhousemarketing.com/christmas2016/rooftoprun/ It's been a tight build, with a very tight timescale, but I'm quite happy with it overall. It's not perfect, and working on a range of devices has been 'fun'. Especially iOS Safari with it's full UI elements :/ I'd be happy to get any feedback and thoughts. Overall I hope it's just a fun couple of minutes distraction! Leave a comment, or if you want, you can find my work twitter (different to my normal twitter) @workhouse_chris
  3. Pretty smooth on the Nokia 735 (WP 8.1) Could be a little higher frame rate, but perfectly playable.
  4. I'm not quite sure if you have any major performance issues tbh, both IE and Chrome's profilers results look good, it's probably just that fps cap that's causing a perceived performance issue - but I don't think it's that bad, especially if you disable the camera zooms and movements. And if you have good reason to keep the cap, then that's fair enough. Still kinda reminds me a little bit of the excellent 3D Ultra Pinball games, which I spent more time playing than I will ever admit
  5. In peoples experience / opinion which is the better approach to building a User Interface for an HTML5 game? I've found mixed opinion and approaches across the web (as with most things HTML5 games related). As far as I can see the advantages in using the DOM are styles can be set by CSS (so no need for sprites and images), and it isn't redrawn by the main game loop on each redraw (as this is then handled by the browser, and presumably is generally accelerated by the GPU). It's also easier to handle user interaction such as click events through the DOM. However I know accessing the DOM can be very slow from javascript, so it's how you mitigate that when you want to update parts of the interface. It's also worth noting that I've encountered performance issues using the DOM for a UI on my mobile phone. Currently the UI is just static and does nothing, but I still get frame drops. I realise it could just be my phone, and I need to check whether not layering the DOM objects over the canvas improves performance - but in my game engine I get a steady 60fps on my phone when the DOM UI is hidden, but this drops massively when it's displayed. This could easily be something I've done though?!
  6. That's really awesome I can't tell though if it's a tad laggy (running in latest Google Chrome on my desktop) or just the zoom feature being a bit fidgety / sensitive.
  7. This game is now here: See Here Update! (17/02/2015) I've added basic level loading functionality. I've now also restructured the gameWorld object and am currently restructuring the render and resource loading containers for neater code. I've also temporarly removed user input (although hopefully restore this again soon, although this does need a better structure - it's on the todo list!). Update! (18/02/2015) Minor updates today, I've added the walls (although there are minor clipping bugs on external north-south walls which still needs fixing). I've also made a number of performance and memory management improvements.
  8. I agree with Maril, I really hate download managers from websites like Cnet. I always think they are trying to hide some rubbish in with the download. I have come across FileHippo recently and that seems to be better than most others I've recently visited.
  9. This is my first ever attempt at making a game in HTML5. Really I just started the project as a skill-building exercise and also to see how far you can push the HTML 5 canvas. Please forgive the fact I've borrowed some of the sprites from a well known retro game (although the UI has been rebuilt entirely in CSS), I have no plans to release this project in any real capacity! The build online is running with an high entity count in a small space just for performance testing. It is largely unoptimised, and I've really only been aiming at desktops, and not mobile devices at this point. So far this has been about 2 days work. I've just started re-structuring the main game world component, mainly for code neatness and efficiency (the current structure is quite naff). I'm not sure where I will go from there, if anywhere! I'd love to hear any feedback, thoughts or recommendations on best practice - I've certainly never used JS like this before!