Deban

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  1. Like
    Deban got a reaction from patrickfabrizius in Performance tests   
    Hello I used to be an AS3 developer. I started a new project, so... why not try something new?
     
    I try different languages and frameworks, all for the web. So here are some bunny benchmarks.
     
    I know pixi has it's own, but most benchmark usually test only rendering power and not processing power.
     
    What can I say?
    You rule!
    Not only in rendering power, but more important in processing power.
  2. Like
    Deban got a reaction from drhayes in Game idea, need help from the PRO´s.. (Thats you guys!)   
    Usually people don't like idea guys.
    You need to ability to create it yourself or the money to pay other people to create it.
     
    What I'm trying to say is that people won't join your project because your idea is cool, ideas are worthless without the power to make them real.
     
    If you want people to join you, you need at least to have a working prototype of your game; and even then people won't like if you are giving ideas while others work.
     
    The other way is paying them, contract people to make you game. You can even work by they side, but people won't usually work for free.
     
     
    That is called a consultation and it's usually pretty expensive. Think about it like contracting a specialist that gives you advice about your business. In a normal business that is pretty expensive, and in video games it's as well.
     
     
    For getting your team assemble:
    For coders you can look in this forum in the Jobs sector or search Stack Overflow for people with high reputation and contact them.
    For graphics you can use Deviant Art. Keep in mind that usually there are two types of artists, the ones that are more graphics designers (GUI, interface and all that thingies) and the more traditional (characters, backgrounds, etc...).
    For music, sound effects and voice acting have a look here.
     
    Good luck.
  3. Like
    Deban got a reaction from Laurent Sigal in Game idea, need help from the PRO´s.. (Thats you guys!)   
    Usually people don't like idea guys.
    You need to ability to create it yourself or the money to pay other people to create it.
     
    What I'm trying to say is that people won't join your project because your idea is cool, ideas are worthless without the power to make them real.
     
    If you want people to join you, you need at least to have a working prototype of your game; and even then people won't like if you are giving ideas while others work.
     
    The other way is paying them, contract people to make you game. You can even work by they side, but people won't usually work for free.
     
     
    That is called a consultation and it's usually pretty expensive. Think about it like contracting a specialist that gives you advice about your business. In a normal business that is pretty expensive, and in video games it's as well.
     
     
    For getting your team assemble:
    For coders you can look in this forum in the Jobs sector or search Stack Overflow for people with high reputation and contact them.
    For graphics you can use Deviant Art. Keep in mind that usually there are two types of artists, the ones that are more graphics designers (GUI, interface and all that thingies) and the more traditional (characters, backgrounds, etc...).
    For music, sound effects and voice acting have a look here.
     
    Good luck.
  4. Like
    Deban got a reaction from codexdesign in Game idea, need help from the PRO´s.. (Thats you guys!)   
    That sounds awesome.
     
    It looks like you actually can make it real. It's really rare that people come with ideas and actually have the resources to be able to make them.
     
    About recruiting.
    You can post an ad here.
    As an alternative, you can post in general game development forums, like here, here and here.
     
    Remember to give as much information as you can. You probably need to ask someone about the technical details.
    Some examples are if your game will be 2D or 3D. What engine/frameworks are you using. How much liberty the programmer is going to have vs how much his code needs to be adapted to a system. Possible roles and responsibilities.
    You can ask most to your coder, he should tell you what he needs from other people to help/complement him.
     
    Anyway, your best chance is getting your hands dirty and instead of waiting for offers, go and actively search people and offer them the job. The best place for that is Stack Overflow because of the reputation system (you can think it like a score system that measures the knowledge) or this forum. This forum will be a little more difficult, as the likes is not that great measure system, hence you need to get your hands a lot more dirty.
     
     
    Good luck making you dream game. 
  5. Like
    Deban got a reaction from vcarluer in Game Maker Studio HTML5 or not...   
    There is no best tool to make games fast, otherwise we will all be using it.
     
    There are two different things that helps making games faster:
    1. Having a problem already solved. For example a rendering engine like Pixi, or collisions and cameras with Phaser and GMS.
    2. Expressing what you want to do.
     
     
    The first one can be really useful or not a big deal at all, depending if your goal is set at short or long term.
    In the long term is not that of a big deal because you solve a specific problem just 1 time (like d13 mentioned). It's faster if it's already solved of course, but it's faster just the first time. If the tool solves you a problem they way you think, there is no problem at all, you can use it and be happy even after. But if it solves it a way that feels weird to you, it will eventually start to slow you down more and more, you will start to have problems expressing yourself.
     
    Expression is the most important thing. Expression is how you think about things, how systems relate to each other in your game, how you approach problems and the way you think.
    The way people think, or more precisely how they approach problems can vary a lot, that is why we have so many different tools. Actually some people are so weird that there is no tool that solve things near the way they think, so they have to create their own tools.
      You will spend most of the time translating your wishes for the computer, expressing your intentions, coding. The more similar that it's your engine/library/tool to your way of thinking and solving problems, the faster the translation will be; ideas will flow faster and the game will be developed faster.   So it's completely up to you. If you find something that suits your brain patterns, stick to it until you change. We change and our way of thinking does also, so don't be afraid to change your tool when you feel it no longer goes your path.
  6. Like
    Deban reacted to SebastianNette in as mouse moves over tiles, they should change color   
    var selected = null; // x = mouse x
    // y = mouse y
    var a = Math.floor(x/96);
    var b = Math.floor(y/96);
    if(x%96 >= 16 && y%96 >= 16) {
    if(selected) {
    // unselect
    }
    selected = tile a b
    }
  7. Like
    Deban reacted to SebastianNette in Manage stages   
    You can use DisplayObjectContainer for that. Just set the visible property to true for the current level and false for all other levels.
    But depending on the game, you might not want to permanently store all the objects of your levels in the memory and instead create them when the level is loading.
  8. Like
    Deban got a reaction from JessC in how to start making html5 games   
    There is no best way.
     
    It really depends on a lot of factors, like the group you work with, your experience and even your tastes.
     
    One of the important things is: why do you want to make games?
    For example, if you just want to create a specific game that you have in mind, Construct 2 will probably be a good ally.
    If you want to learn about the technology, and how games are made, you will be better reading some books.
    If you want to make money with games, you will probably be better with an engine.
    And so on, and on.
     
     
    To make you a recommendation, we will need more information in what your goal is.
    But anyway, some of the options are (but are not limited to):
    -The pure theoretical. If you have more a curiosity approach, you could probably be happy reading some tutorials on the web.
    -The game of my dreams approach. In this case you don't care about technical things, you just want to make the game. For this I will recommend Construct 2.
    I ran out of imagination for approaches.
    -You can use javascript and create everything from scratch. Really good if you want to learn how all the things works and how everything is done. Pretty suicidal if you just want to make games, you will be reinventing the wheel time and time again.
    -You can use a framework. That means there a lot of tools already made for you that you can use. But at the same time there isn't any methodology that you must use, you can do it the way you like.
    -Yo can use an engine. Not only lots of tools, but the interconnection of the tool are already done and there is a way to solve things that is already created. If the way fits with your needs and feels comfortable it will be all you need.
  9. Like
    Deban got a reaction from ebraheeemz in how to start making html5 games   
    If you can't decide where to start, the worst that you can do is procrastinate.
     
    You can pick up something and make your game with it, if you don't like it when you finish your game you can change your tool, but you will have a finished game.
    That doesn't work for me, but works for a lot of people. Other thing you can do, is make small experimental games in different platforms, like a breakout clone. And that way you will know a lot faster what you like, but you won't have any finished game.
    I recommend trying this:
    Construct 2. Will give you a pretty good senses of how to think in order to make a game.
    Unity 3D. A lot of people seems to really love it and say it's really easy and fast. I can't understand why, but different people, different ways.
    Phaser. Contains all the tools to make your games but no longer holds your hand.
    Pixi. Total freedom, total responsibility.
     
    The common wisdom say start small, here you have an example of a really really simple mmo and as you can see its a LOT of work.
     
     
    Making games is pretty easy, making good games is hard work.
    Games are a lot more than the sum of its parts. In a game everything come together to form a specific aesthetic and a experience for a living human being behind the screen. And even then, probably different persons will have different experiences.
  10. Like
    Deban got a reaction from ebraheeemz in how to start making html5 games   
    There is no best way.
     
    It really depends on a lot of factors, like the group you work with, your experience and even your tastes.
     
    One of the important things is: why do you want to make games?
    For example, if you just want to create a specific game that you have in mind, Construct 2 will probably be a good ally.
    If you want to learn about the technology, and how games are made, you will be better reading some books.
    If you want to make money with games, you will probably be better with an engine.
    And so on, and on.
     
     
    To make you a recommendation, we will need more information in what your goal is.
    But anyway, some of the options are (but are not limited to):
    -The pure theoretical. If you have more a curiosity approach, you could probably be happy reading some tutorials on the web.
    -The game of my dreams approach. In this case you don't care about technical things, you just want to make the game. For this I will recommend Construct 2.
    I ran out of imagination for approaches.
    -You can use javascript and create everything from scratch. Really good if you want to learn how all the things works and how everything is done. Pretty suicidal if you just want to make games, you will be reinventing the wheel time and time again.
    -You can use a framework. That means there a lot of tools already made for you that you can use. But at the same time there isn't any methodology that you must use, you can do it the way you like.
    -Yo can use an engine. Not only lots of tools, but the interconnection of the tool are already done and there is a way to solve things that is already created. If the way fits with your needs and feels comfortable it will be all you need.
  11. Like
    Deban got a reaction from Antagonist in code structure frameworks   
    Talking with broad strokes, you are looking for a state machine.
     
    The simplified version of the logic is this:
    You have a state manager, which takes control of the game loop, updates the current state and check the conditions to change states.
     
    How you implement it, is totally personal, use the way you feel comfortable. Maybe you check some bools to see if a state changed, maybe you call a method of the state manager from the state, maybe you use events.
    You can also make transitions between states, as Antagonist said.
     
    The best way, is the way that makes you code faster, and that is personal.
  12. Like
    Deban got a reaction from d13 in Performance tests   
    I gave another look at the code and made an improvement, wasn't big... but now it render 5,100 bunnies with ~50 fps
     
     
    Let's see... Flash always was slow. But then AIR came and there was some mayor improvement with the rendering power with stage 3d. Problem is that the improvements where almost unilateral to stage 3d, and as4 never came along
     
    Genome use stage 3d at its full potential, and it uses Haxe to minimize the processing overhead. But when it comes down to your as3 code, there isn't much to be done. AS3 will always be the bottleneck.
     
    This is what make the difference:
    public function CheckCollitions():void { var colliding:Boolean; var bunny1:Bunny; var rectangle1:Rectangle = new Rectangle(0, 0, 10, 10); var rectangle2:Rectangle = new Rectangle(5, 8, 10, 10); for (var i:int = 0; i < bunnies.length; i++) { bunny1 = bunnies[i]; for (var j:int = 0; j < 100; j++) colliding = Collition.Rectangles(rectangle1, rectangle2); }} The Collition.Rectangles is a basic axis aligned box collition detection, and it's even inlined.
     
    Edit: I thought that maybe the Rectangle that came with flash was using getters and setter, and the function was making extra slow. But no, I create a custom rectangle class and it's the same performance (even a little worse).
  13. Like
    Deban reacted to d13 in Desktop games   
    You can use node-webkit:
     
    https://github.com/rogerwang/node-webkit
     
    The greenworks plugin let's you use it with Steam:
     
    https://github.com/greenheartgames/greenworks
  14. Like
    Deban got a reaction from hubert in Performance tests   
    Hello I used to be an AS3 developer. I started a new project, so... why not try something new?
     
    I try different languages and frameworks, all for the web. So here are some bunny benchmarks.
     
    I know pixi has it's own, but most benchmark usually test only rendering power and not processing power.
     
    What can I say?
    You rule!
    Not only in rendering power, but more important in processing power.